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How to Debug Applications in Flash

Debugging Applications

Debugging your scripts

Debugging a SWF file from a remote location

Displaying and modifying variables

Using the Watch list

Displaying movie clip properties and changing editable properties

Setting and removing breakpoints

About working through lines of code

Using the Output panel

Listing a SWF file's objects

Listing a SWF file's variables

About displaying text field properties for debugging

Using the trace statement

 

Debugging Applications

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Macromedia Flash Basic 8 and Macromedia Flash Professional 8 provide several tools for testing ActionScript in your SWF files. The Debugger lets you find errors in a SWF file while it's running in the Flash Debug Player (see Debugging your scripts). Flash also provides the following additional debugging tools:

  • The Output panel, which shows error messages, including some runtime errors, and lists of variables and objects (see Using the Output panel)

  • The trace statement, which sends programming notes and values of expressions to the Output panel (see Using the trace statement)

  • The throw and try..catch..finally statements, which let you test and respond to runtime errors from within your script.

This section describes how to debug your scripts and Flash applications by using the Debugger, and how to use the Output panel. For more information, see the following topics:

 

Debugging your scripts

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The Debugger in Flash 8 helps you find errors in your SWF file while it runs in Flash Player. You must view your SWF file in a special version of Flash Player, which is called Flash Debug Player. When you install the authoring tool, Flash Debug Player is installed automatically. So if you install Flash and browse a website that has Flash content, or use the Test Movie option, you're using Flash Debug Player. You can also run the installer in the following directory in Windows or Macintosh: Flash install directory\Players\Debug\ directory or start the stand-alone Flash Debug Player from the same directory.

When you use the Control > Test Movie command to test SWF files that implement keyboard controls (tabbing, keyboard shortcuts created using Key.addListener(), and so on), select Control > Disable Keyboard Shortcuts. Selecting this option prevents the authoring environment from "grabbing" keystrokes, and lets them pass through to the player. For example, in the authoring environment, Control+U opens the Preferences dialog box. If your script assigns Control+U to an action that underlines text onscreen, when you use Test Movie, pressing Control+U opens the Preferences dialog box instead of running the action that underlines text. To let the Control+U command pass through to the player, you must select Control > Disable Keyboard Shortcuts.

CAUTION : When you use a non-English application on an English system, the Test Movie command fails if any part of the SWF file path has characters that cannot be represented with the MBCS encoding scheme. For example, Japanese paths on an English system do not work. All areas of the application that use the external player are subject to this limitation.

The Debugger shows a hierarchical display list of movie clips currently loaded in Flash Player. Using the Debugger, you can display and modify variable and property values as the SWF file plays, and you can use breakpoints to stop the SWF file and step through ActionScript code line by line.

You can use the Debugger in test mode with local files, or you can use it to test files on a web server in a remote location. The Debugger lets you set breakpoints in your ActionScript that stop Flash Player and step through the code as it runs. You can then go back to your scripts and edit them so that they produce the correct results.

After it's activated, the Debugger status bar displays the URL or local path of the file, tells whether the file is running in test mode or from a remote location, and shows a live view of the movie clip display list. When movie clips are added to or removed from the file, the display list reflects the changes immediately. You can resize the display list by moving the horizontal splitter.

To activate the Debugger in test mode:

  • Select Control > Debug Movie.

This command exports the SWF file with debugging information (the SWD file) and enables debugging of the SWF file. It opens the Debugger and opens the SWF file in test mode.

NOTE : If necessary, you can resize the various regions of the Debugger panel. When your pointer changes between each region, you can drag to resize the Display list, Watch list, and code view.


 

Debugging a SWF file from a remote location

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You can debug a remote SWF file by using the stand-alone, ActiveX, or plug-in version of Flash Player. To find these versions of Flash Player, look in the following directory in Windows or Macintosh: Flash install directory\Players\Debug\.

When you export a SWF file, you can enable debugging in the file and create a debugging password. If you don't enable debugging, the Debugger is not activated.

To ensure that only trusted users can run your SWF files in the Flash Debug Player, you can publish your file with a debugging password. As in JavaScript or HTML, users can view client-side variables in ActionScript. To store variables securely, you must send them to a server-side application instead of storing them in your file. However, as a Flash developer, you may have other trade secrets, such as movie clip structures, that you do not want to reveal. You can use a debugging password to protect your work.

To enable remote debugging of a SWF file:

  1. Select File > Publish Settings.

  2. On the Flash tab of the Publish Settings dialog box, select Debugging permitted.

  3. To set a password, enter a password in the Password box.

    After you set this password, no one can download information to the Debugger without the password. However, if you leave the Password box blank, no password is required.

  4. Close the Publish Settings dialog box, and select one of the following commands:

    • Control > Debug Movie

    • File > Export > Export Movie

    • File > Publish

    Flash creates a debugging file, with the extension .swd, and saves it in the same directory as the SWF file. The SWD file is used to debug ActionScript, and contains information that lets you use breakpoints and step through code.

  5. Place the SWD file in the same directory as the SWF file on the server.

    If the SWD file is not in the same directory as the SWF file, you can still debug remotely; however, the Debugger has no breakpoint information, so you can't step through code.

  6.  In Flash, select Window > Debugger.

  7. In the Debugger, select Enable Remote Debugging from the pop-up menu (at the upper right of the panel).

To activate the Debugger from a remote location:

  1. Open the Flash authoring application.

  2. In a browser or in the debug version of the stand-alone player, open the published SWF file from the remote location.

    The Remote Debug dialog box appears.

    NOTE : If the Remote Debug dialog box doesn't appear, Flash can't find the SWD file. In this case, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) in the SWF file to display the context menu, and select Debugger.

  3. In the Remote Debug dialog box, select Localhost or Other Machine:

    • Select Localhost if the Debug player and the Flash authoring application are on the same computer. \

    • Select Other Machine if the Debug player and the Flash authoring application are not on the same computer. Enter the IP address of the computer running the Flash authoring application.

  4. When a connection is established, a password prompt appears.

Enter your debugging password if you set one.

The display list of the SWF file appears in the Debugger. If the SWF file doesn't play, the Debugger might be paused, so click Continue to start it.

 

Displaying and modifying variables 

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The Variables tab in the Debugger shows the names and values of any global and timeline variables in the SWF file that are selected in the display list. If you change the value of a variable on the Variables tab, you can see the change reflected in the SWF file while it runs. For example, to test collision detection in a game, you can enter the variable value to position a ball in the correct location next to a wall.

The Locals tab in the Debugger shows the names and values of any local variables that are available in the line of ActionScript where the SWF file is currently stopped, at a breakpoint or anywhere else within a user-defined function.

To display a variable:

  1. Select the movie clip containing the variable from the display list.

    To display global variables, select the _global clip in the display list.

    NOTE : If necessary, you can resize the various regions of the Debugger panel. When your changes between each region, you can drag to resize the Display list, Watch list, and code view.

  2. Click the Variables tab.

The display list updates automatically as the SWF file plays. If a movie clip is removed from the SWF file at a specific frame, that movie clip, along with its variable and variable name, is also removed from the display list in the Debugger. However, if you mark a variable for the Watch list (see Using the Watch list), the variable is removed from the Variables tab, but can still be viewed in the Watch tab.

To modify a variable value:

  • Double-click the value, and enter a new value.

The value cannot be an expression. For example, you can use "Hello", 3523, or "http://www.macromedia.com", and you cannot use x + 2 or eval("name:" +i). The value can be a string (any value surrounded by quotation marks [""]), a number, or a Boolean value (true or false).

NOTE : To write the value of an expression to the Output panel in test mode, use the trace statement. See Using the trace statement.
 

Using the Watch list  

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To monitor a set of critical variables in a manageable way, you can mark variables to appear in the Watch list. The Watch list shows the absolute path to the variable and the value. You can also enter a new variable value in the Watch list the same way as in the Variables tab. The Watch list can show only variables and properties that you can access by using an absolute target path, such as _global or _root.

If you add a local variable to the Watch list, its value appears only when Flash Player is stopped at a line of ActionScript where that variable is in scope. All other variables appear while the SWF file is playing. If the Debugger can't find the value of the variable, the value is listed as undefined.

NOTE : If necessary, you can resize the various regions of the Debugger panel. When your changes between each region, you can drag to resize the Display list, Watch list, and code view.
The Watch list can show only variables, not properties or functions.

Variables marked for the Watch list and variables in the Watch list

To add variables to the Watch list, do one of the following:

  • On the Variables or Locals tab, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) a selected variable and then select Watch from the context menu. A blue dot appears next to the variable.

  • On the Watch tab, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Add from the context menu. Double-click in the name column, and enter the target path to the variable name in the field.

To remove variables from the Watch list:

  • On the Watch tab or the Variables tab, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Remove from the context menu.

Displaying movie clip properties and changing editable properties 

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The Debugger's Properties tab shows all the property values of any movie clip on the Stage. You can change a value and see its effect in the SWF file while it runs. Some movie clip properties are read-only and cannot be changed.

NOTE : If necessary, you can resize the various regions of the Debugger panel. When your pointer changes between each region, you can drag to resize the Display list, Watch list, and code view.

To display a movie clip's properties in the Debugger:

  1. Select a movie clip from the display list.

  2. Click the Properties tab in the Debugger.

To modify a property value:

  • Double-click the value, and enter a new value.

The value cannot be an expression. For example, you can enter 50 or "clearwater", but you cannot enter x + 50. The value can be a string (any value surrounded by quotation marks [""]), a number, or a Boolean value (true or false). You can't enter object or array values (for example, {id: "rogue"} or [1, 2, 3]) in the Debugger.

NOTE : To write the value of an expression to the Output panel in test mode, use the trace statement. See Using the trace statement.
 

Setting and removing breakpoints 

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A breakpoint lets you stop a Flash application running in Flash Debug Player at a specific line of ActionScript. You can use breakpoints to test possible trouble spots in your code. For example, if you've written a set of if..else if statements and can't determine which one is executing, you can add a breakpoint before the statements and examine them one by one in the Debugger.

You can set breakpoints in the Actions panel, Script window, or in the Debugger. Breakpoints set in the Actions panel are saved with the FLA file. Breakpoints set in the Debugger and Script window are not saved in the FLA file and are valid only for the current debugging session.

CAUTION : If you set breakpoints in the Actions panel or Script window and press the Auto Format button, you might notice that some breakpoints are no longer in the correct location.

ActionScript might be moved to a different line when your code is formatted because sometimes empty lines are removed. You might need to check and modify your breakpoints after you click Auto Format, or to auto format your scripts before you set breakpoints.

To set or remove a breakpoint in the Actions panel or Script window during a debugging session, do one of the following:

  • Click in the left margin. A red dot indicates a breakpoint.

  • Click the Debug options button above the Script pane.

  • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) to display the context menu, and select Set Breakpoint, Remove Breakpoint, or Remove Breakpoints in this File.

    NOTE : In the Script window, you can also select Remove Breakpoints in all AS Files.

  • Press Control+Shift+B (Windows) or Command+Shift+B (Macintosh).

NOTE : In some previous versions of Flash, clicking in the left margin of the Script pane selected the line of code; now it adds or removes a breakpoint. To select a line of code, use Control-click (Windows) or Command-click (Macintosh).

To set and remove breakpoints in the Debugger, do one of the following:

  • Click in the left margin. A red dot indicates a breakpoint.

  • Click the Toggle Breakpoint or Remove All Breakpoints button above the code view.

  • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) to display the context menu, and select Set Breakpoint, Remove Breakpoint, or Remove All Breakpoints in the File.

  • Press Control+Shift+B (Windows) or Command+Shift+B (Macintosh).

After Flash Player stops at a breakpoint, you can step into, over, or out of that line of code. (See About working through lines of code.)

You can set breakpoints in the Script window, and have them show up in the debugger if the debugger has the same path to the ActionScript file as the one that was opened in the Script window. Likewise, you can set breakpoints in the debugger during a debug session, and have the breakpoints appear in the ActionScript file if you open it in the Script window.

NOTE : Do not set breakpoints on comments or empty lines; if breakpoints are set on comments or empty lines, the breakpoints are ignored.

About the breakpoints XML file

When you work with breakpoints in an external script file in the Script window, the AsBreakpoints.xml file lets you store breakpoint information. The AsBreakpoints.xml file is written to the Local Settings directory, in the following locations:

Windows:

Hard Disk\Documents and Settings\User\Local Settings\Application Data\Macromedia\Flash 8\language\Configuration\Debugger\

Macintosh:

Macintosh HD/Users/User/Library/Application Support/Macromedia Flash 8/Configuration/Debugger/

An example of the AsBreakpoints.xml is as follows:

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<flash_breakpoints version="1.0">

<file name="c:\tmp\myscript.as">

<breakpoint line="10"></breakpoint>

<breakpoint line="8"></breakpoint>

<breakpoint line="6"></breakpoint>

</file>

<file name="c:\tmp\myotherscript.as">

<breakpoint line="11"></breakpoint>

<breakpoint line="7"></breakpoint>

<breakpoint line="4"></breakpoint>

</file>

</flash_breakpoints>

The XML file consists of the following tags:

flash_breakpoints This node has an attribute, called version, that indicates the version of the XML file. Flash 8 is version 1.0.

file A child node of flash_breakpoints. This node has one attribute, called name, that indicates the name of the file that contains breakpoints.

breakpoint A child node of file. This node has an attribute, called line, that indicates the line number where the breakpoint exists.

The AsBreakpoints.xml file is read when you launch Flash, and generated again when you shut down Flash. AsBreakpoints.xml is used to keep track of the breakpoints between Flash development sessions. An internal data structure maintains the breakpoints as you set and remove them while developing in Flash.
 

About working through lines of code  

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When you start a debugging session, Flash Player is paused so that you can toggle breakpoints. If you set breakpoints in the Actions panel, you can click Continue to play the SWF file until it reaches a breakpoint. If you didn't set breakpoints in the Actions panel, you can use the jump menu in the Debugger to select any script in the SWF file. When you have selected a script, you can add breakpoints to it.

After adding breakpoints, you must click Continue to start the SWF file. The Debugger stops when it reaches the breakpoint. For example, in the following code, suppose a breakpoint is set inside a button on the myFunction() line:

on(press){

myFunction();

}

When you click the button, the breakpoint is reached and Flash Player pauses. You can now bring the Debugger to the first line of myFunction() wherever it is defined in the document. You can also continue through or exit out of the function.

As you step through lines of code, the values of variables and properties change in the Watch list and in the Variables, Locals, and Properties tabs. A yellow arrow on the left side of the Debugger's code view indicates the line at which the Debugger stopped. Use the following buttons along the top of the code view:



Step In advances the Debugger (indicated by the yellow arrow) into a function. Step In works only for user-defined functions.

In the following example, if you place a breakpoint at line 7 and click Step In, the Debugger advances to line 2, and another click of Step In advances you to line 3. Clicking Step In for lines that do not have user-defined functions in them advances the Debugger over a line of code. For example, if you stop at line 2 and select Step In, the Debugger advances to line 3, as shown in the following example:

1 function myFunction() {

2 x = 0;

3 y = 0;

4 }

5

6 mover = 1;

7 myFunction();

8 mover = 0;

NOTE : The numbers in this code snippet denote line numbers. They are not part of the code.

Step Out advances the Debugger out of a function. This button works only if you are currently stopped in a user-defined function; it moves the yellow arrow to the line after the line where that function was called. In the previous example, if you place a breakpoint at line 3 and click Step Out, the Debugger moves to line 8. Clicking Step Out at a line that is not within a user-defined function is the same as clicking Continue. For example, if you stop at line 6 and click Step Out, the player continues to execute the script until it encounters a breakpoint.
Step Over advances the Debugger over a line of code. This button moves the yellow arrow to the next line in the script. In the previous example, if you are stopped at line 7 and click Step

Over, you advance directly to line 8 without stepping through myFunction(), although the myFunction() code still executes.

Continue leaves the line at which the player is stopped and continues playing until a breakpoint is reached.

Stop Debugging makes the Debugger inactive but continues to play the SWF file in Flash Player.
 

Using the Output panel  

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In test mode, the Output panel shows information to help you troubleshoot your SWF file. Some information (such as syntax errors) appear automatically. You can show other information by using the List Objects and List Variables commands. (See Listing a SWF file's objects and Listing a SWF file's variables.)

If you use the trace statement in your scripts, you can send specific information to the Output panel as the SWF file runs. This could include notes about the SWF file's status or the value of an expression. (See Using the trace statement.)

To display or hide the Output panel, do one of the following:

  • Select Window > Output
  • Press F2.

To work with the contents of the Output panel, click the pop-up menu in the upper right corner to see your options.



The following table lists the options available on the Output panel's pop-up menu:

Menu item

What it does

Word wrap

Toggles whether long lines wrap automatically, so the user does not have to use the horizontal scroll bar to view the entire line of characters. If selected, lines wrap; otherwise, lines do not wrap.

Copy

Copies the entire contents of the Output panel to the computer's Clipboard. To copy a selected portion of the output, select the area you want to copy and then select Copy.

Clear

Clears all output currently in the Output panel.

Find

Opens a dialog box that you can use to find a keyword or phrase within the Output panel contents.

Find Again

Attempts to locate the next instance of a keyword or phrase in the Output panel contents.

Save to File

Saves the current contents of the Output panel to an external text file.

Print

Shows the Print dialog box, which lets you print the current contents of the Output panel to an installed printer or installed programs such as Flash Paper or Acrobat.

Filter level

Lets you select two possible levels of output: None or Verbose. Selecting None suppresses all output sent to the browser.

Maximize Panel

Maximizes the Output panel when it is docked.

Close Panel

Closes the Output panel and clears the contents of the panel.

 

Listing a SWF file's objects

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In test mode, the List Objects command shows the level, frame, object type (shape, movie clip, or button), target paths, and instance names of movie clips, buttons, and text fields in a hierarchical list. This option is especially useful for finding the correct target path and instance name. Unlike the Debugger, the list does not update automatically as the SWF file plays; you must select the List Objects command each time you want to send the information to the Output panel.

CAUTION : Selecting the List Objects command clears any information that currently appears in the Output panel. If you do not want to lose information in the Output panel, select Save to File from the Output panel Options pop-up menu or copy and paste the information to another location before selecting the List Objects command.

The List Objects command does not list all ActionScript data objects. In this context, an object is considered to be a shape or symbol on the Stage.

To display a list of objects in a SWF file:

  1. If your SWF file is not running in test mode, select Control > Test Movie.

  2. Select Debug > List Objects.

A list of all the objects currently on the Stage appears in the Output panel, as shown in the following example:

Level #0: Frame=1 Label="Scene_1"

Button: Target="_level0.myButton"

Shape:

Movie Clip: Frame=1 Target="_level0.myMovieClip"

Shape:

Edit Text: Target="_level0.myTextField" Text="This is sample text."

Listing a SWF file's variables

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In test mode, the List Variables command shows a list of all the variables currently in the SWF file. This list is especially useful for finding the correct variable target path and variable name. Unlike the Debugger, the list does not update automatically as the SWF file plays; you must select the List Variables command each time you want to send the information to the Output panel.

The List Variables command also shows global variables declared with the _global identifier. The global variables appear at the top of the List Variables output in a Global Variables section, and each variable has a _global prefix.

In addition, the List Variables command shows getter/setter properties--properties that are created with the Object.addProperty() method and start get or set methods. A getter/setter property appears with any other properties in the object to which it belongs. To make these properties easily distinguishable from other variables, the value of a getter/setter property is prefixed with the string [getter/setter]. The value that appears for a getter/setter property is determined by evaluating the get function of the property.

CAUTION : Selecting the List Variables command clears any information that appears in the Output panel. If you do not want to lose information in the Output panel, select Save to File from the Output panel Options pop-up menu or copy and paste the information to another location before selecting the List Variables command.

To display a list of variables in a SWF file:

  1. If your SWF file is not running in test mode, select Control > Test Movie.

  2. Select Debug > List Variables.

A list of all the variables currently in the SWF file appears in the Output panel, as shown in the following example:

Global Variables:

Variable _global.mycolor = "lime_green"

Level #0:

Variable _level0.$version = "WIN 7,0,19,0"

Variable _level0.myArray = [object #1, class 'Array'] [

0:"socks",

1:"gophers",

2:"mr.claw"

]

Movie Clip: Target="_level0.my_mc"

 

About displaying text field properties for debugging

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To obtain debugging information about TextField objects, you can use the Debug > List Variables command in test mode. The Output panel uses the following conventions to show TextField objects:

  • If a property is not found on the object, it does not appear.

  • No more than four properties appear on a line.

  • A property with a string value appears on a separate line.

  • If any other properties are defined for the object after the built-in properties are processed, they are added to the display by using the rules in the second and third points of this list.

  • Color properties appear as hexadecimal numbers (0x00FF00).

  • The properties appear in the following order: variable, text, htmlText, html, textWidth, textHeight, maxChars, borderColor, backgroundColor, textColor, border, background, wordWrap, password, multiline, selectable, scroll, hscroll, maxscroll, maxhscroll, bottomScroll, type, embedFonts, restrict, length, tabIndex, autoSize.

The List Objects command in the Debug menu (during test mode) lists TextField objects. If an instance name is specified for a text field, the Output panel shows the full target path including the instance name in the following form:

Target = "target path"
 

Using the trace statement

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When you use the trace statement in a script, you can send information to the Output panel. For example, while testing a SWF file or scene, you can send specific programming notes to the panel or have specific results appear when a button is pressed or a frame plays. The trace statement is similar to the JavaScript alert statement.

When you use the trace statement in a script, you can use expressions as parameters. The value of an expression appears in the Output panel in test mode, as shown by the following code snippet and image of the Output panel.

To use the trace statement in a script:

  1. Select Frame 1 of the Timeline, and add the following code in the Actions panel:

    this.createEmptyMovieClip("img_mc", 10);

    var mclListener:Object = new Object();

    mclListener.onLoadInit = function(target_mc:MovieClip) {

    trace(target_mc+" loaded in "+getTimer()+" ms");

    };

    mclListener.onLoadError = function(target_mc:MovieClip, errorCode:String, httpStatus:Number) {

    trace(">> error downloading image into "+target_mc);

    trace(">>\t errorCode="+errorCode+", httpStatus="+httpStatus);

    };

    var img_mcl:MovieClipLoader = new MovieClipLoader();

    img_mcl.addListener(mclListener);
     

  2. img_mcl.loadClip("http://www.helpexamples.com/flash/images/404.jpg", img_mc);

    Select Control > Test Movie to test the SWF file.

The Output panel displays the following message:


 

Copyright ADOBE - All Rights Reserved Worldwide

 

 

More Topics:

Working with Flash Documents

How to work in Flash WorkSpace

Working with Projects in Flash

Process to Build your First Application in Flash

Using Symbols, Instances and Library Assets in Flash

How to Build Video Player in Flash

How to Work with Color, Strokes and Fills in Flash

How to Create Document in Flash

What is Vector and Bitmap Graphics in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 1

How to Work with Text in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 2

How to Use Imported Artwork in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 3

How to Work with Graphic Objects in Flash

How to Work with Layers in Flash

How to Use Filters and Blends

Working with Graphics in Flash

What is Accessibility Features in Flash

How to Create Motion (Shape Tween & Motion Tween) in Flash

How to Create an Application in Flash

What is Masking in Flash

How to Work with Video in Flash

How to Use Layout Tools in Flash

What are Behaviors in Flash

How to Work with Sound in Flash

How to Create Symbols and Instances in Flash

What is ActionScript in Flash

How to Write ActionScript With Script Assist in Flash

How to Add Button Animation and Navigation in Flash

What is Data Integration in Flash

How to Work with Screens

How to Create a Presentation with Screens

What is Extending Flash

How to Create Multilanguage Text in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Draw in Flash

What is Flash Lite

Ways of Data Integration

How to Create Graphics: Create a Timeline Animation in Flash

Getting Started with Flash Lite in Flash

How to Publish Flash Documents

How to Create Graphics: Making Animations with Easing

Learning Flash Lite 1.X ActionScript in Flash

How to Export Flash Content and Images from Flash

How to Create Graphics: Applying Gradients in Flash

Process of Writing and Editing ActionScript 2.0 in Flash

How to Create Accessible Content in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Apply Graphic Filters and Blends

What is Data and Data Types in Flash

Process of Printing from SWF Files in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Use Script Assist mode in Flash

Learn Syntax and Language Fundamentals in Flash

How to Create E-learning Content in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Write Scripts in Flash

Working with Functions and Methods in Flash

Process of Using Templates in Flash

Using ActionScript: Process of Adding Interactivity in Flash

What are Classes in Flash

Control Tag Summary of XML to UI in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Create a Form with Conditional Logic and Send Data in Flash

What is Inheritance in Flash

What is Data Integration: Overview

Using ActionScript: How to Work with Objects and Classes in Flash

Overview on Interfaces in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XML for a Timesheet

How to Work with Text and Strings in Flash

How to use Handling Events in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XUpdate to Update the Timesheet

Learning Animation, Filters and Drawings in Flash

How to Work with Movie Clips in Flash

How to Create Interaction with ActionScript in Flash

How to Work with Images, Sound, and Video in Flash

How to Work with External Data in Flash

What is Security in Flash

How to Debug Applications in Flash

List of Error Messages in Flash

Using Object-Oriented Programming with ActionScript 1.0 in Flash

How to Write Scripts for Earlier Versions of Flash Player in Flash

List of all Keyboard Keys and Key Code Values for using in Flash

Terminology

Introduction to Components in Flash

What are Components in Flash

How to Create an Application with Components

How to Work with Components in Flash

How to Handle Component Events in Flash

How to Customize Components in Flash

How to Create Components in Flash

What is Collection Properties in Flash