What is Software? | What is Education? | What is Technology? | What is Research? | What is Wi-Fi? | What is Communication? | What is Customer Service?

Free SEO Tutorials & Help

Tutorials:   Adobe Flash   Adobe Photoshop   CorelDRAW   SEO  

Site Map

Website Development | Cable & Broadband Magazine | Solutions for Higher Education | Auction Anything Online

Adobe Flash Help & Tutorials

 Back to Topics

 

How to Use Imported Artwork in Flash

Placing artwork into Flash

Importing Fireworks PNG files

Fireworks text supported in Flash

Importing FreeHand MX files

Importing Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF files

About AutoCAD DXF files

Working with imported bitmaps

Using the Property inspector to work with bitmaps

Setting bitmap properties

Importing bitmaps at runtime

Applying a bitmap fill

Editing bitmaps in an external editor

Breaking apart a bitmap

Converting bitmaps to vector graphics

Placing artwork into Flash

TOP

Flash recognizes a variety of vector and bitmap formats. You can place artwork into Flash by importing it onto the Stage in the current Flash document or into the library for the current document. You can also import bitmaps by pasting them on the Stage in the current document. All bitmaps that you import directly into a Flash document are automatically added to the document's library.

Graphic files that you import into Flash must be at least 2 pixels x 2 pixels in size.

You can load JPEG files into a Flash movie during runtime using the loadMovie action or method. For detailed information, see loadMovie (MovieClip.loadMovie method) in ActionScript 2.0 Language Reference.

Flash imports vector graphics, bitmaps, and sequences of images as follows:

  • When you import vector images into Flash from FreeHand, you can select options for preserving FreeHand layers, pages, and text blocks.

  • When you import PNG images from Fireworks, you can import files as editable objects that you can modify in Flash, or as flattened files that you can edit and update in Fireworks.

  • You can select options for preserving images, text, and guides.

    NOTE : If you import a PNG file from Fireworks by cutting and pasting, the file is converted to a bitmap.

  • When you import Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF files into Flash, you can select options for converting pages and layers. You can choose to rasterize all content, including text.

  • Vector images from SWF and Windows Metafile Format (WMF) files that you import directly into a Flash document (instead of into a library) are imported as a group in the current layer.

  • Bitmaps (scanned photographs, BMP files) that you import directly into a Flash document are imported as single objects in the current layer. Flash preserves the transparency settings of imported bitmaps. Because importing a bitmap can increase the file size of a SWF file, you may want to compress imported bitmaps.

    NOTE : Bitmap transparency may not be preserved when bitmaps are imported by dragging and dropping from an application or desktop to Flash. To preserve transparency, use the File > Import to Stage or Import to Library command for importing.

  • Any sequence of images (for example, a PICT and BMP sequence) that you import directly into a Flash document is imported as successive keyframes of the current layer.

To import a file into Flash:

  1. Do one of the following:

    • To import a file directly into the current Flash document, select File > Import to Stage.

    • To import a file into the library for the current Flash document, select File > Import to Library. (To use a library item in a document, drag it onto the Stage.)

  2. In the Import dialog box, select a file format from the Files of Type (Windows) or Show (Macintosh) pop-up menu.

  3. Navigate to the desired file and select it.

    If an imported file has multiple layers, Flash may create new layers (depending on the import file type). Any new layers will be displayed in the Timeline.

  4. Click Open.

  5. If the name of the file you are importing ends with a number, and there are additional sequentially numbered files in the same folder, select whether to import the sequence of files.

    • Click Yes to import all the sequential files.

    • Click No to import only the specified file.

    The following are examples of filenames that can be used as a sequence:

    Frame001.gif, Frame002.gif, Frame003.gif

    Bird 1, Bird 2, Bird 3

    Walk-001.ai, Walk-002.ai, Walk-003.ai

To paste a bitmap from another application directly into the current Flash document:

  1. Copy the image in the other application.

  2. In Flash, select Edit > Paste in Center or Edit > Paste in Place.

 

Importing Fireworks PNG files

TOP

You can import Fireworks PNG files into Flash as flattened images or as editable objects. When you import a PNG file as a flattened image, the entire file (including any vector artwork) is rasterized, or converted to a bitmap image. When you import a PNG file as editable objects, vector artwork in the file is preserved in vector format. You can choose to preserve placed bitmaps, text, filters (called effects in FireWorks) and guides in the PNG file when you import it as editable objects.

Using Fireworks effects and blend modes in Flash

Adobe Flash cs provides support for Fireworks filters, blend modes, and text. When importing Fireworks PNG files, you can retain many of the filters and blend modes applied to objects within Fireworks, and continue to modify those filters and blends using Flash 8.

Flash only supports modifiable filters and blends for objects imported as text and movie clips. If an effect or blend mode is not supported, Flash 8 will rasterize or ignore it when it is imported.
If you want to import a Fireworks PNG file that contains filters or blends that Flash does not support, you must rasterize the file during the import process. After this operation, you will not be able to edit the file.

 

Fireworks text supported in Flash

TOP

When you import text from Fireworks into Flash 8, the text is imported with the default anti-alias setting of the current document.

If you import the PNG file as a flattened image, you can start Fireworks from within Flash and edit the original PNG file (with vector data).

When you import multiple PNG files in a batch, you select import settings one time. Flash uses the same settings for all files in the batch.

NOTE : You can edit bitmap images in Flash by converting the bitmap images to vector artwork or by breaking apart the bitmap images.

To import a Fireworks PNG file:

  1. Select File > Import to Stage or Import to Library.

  2. In the Import dialog box, select PNG Image from the Files of Type (Windows) or Show (Macintosh) pop-up menu.

  3. Navigate to a Fireworks PNG image and select it.

  4. Click Open.

  5. In the Fireworks PNG Import Settings dialog box, select one of the following for File Structure:

    Import as Movie Clip and Retain Layers imports the PNG file as a movie clip, with all of its frames and layers intact inside the movie clip symbol.

    Import into New Layer in Current Scene imports the PNG file into the current Flash document in a single new layer at the top of the stacking order. The Fireworks layers are flattened into the single layer. The Fireworks frames are contained in the new layer.

  6. For Objects, select one of the following:

    Rasterize if Necessary to Maintain Appearance preserves Fireworks fills, strokes, and effects in Flash.

    Keep All Paths Editable keeps all objects as editable vector paths. Some Fireworks fills, strokes, and effects are lost on import.

  7. For Text, select one of the following:

    Rasterize if Necessary to Maintain Appearance preserves Fireworks fills, strokes, and effects in text imported into Flash.

    Keep All Paths Editable keeps all text editable. Some Fireworks fills, strokes, and effects are lost on import.

  8. Select Import as a Single Flattened Image to flatten the PNG file into a single bitmap image. When this option is selected, all other options are dimmed.

  9. Click OK.

 

Importing FreeHand MX files

TOP

You can import FreeHand files in version 7 or later directly into Flash. FreeHand MX is the best choice for creating vector graphics for import into Flash, because you can preserve FreeHand layers, text blocks, library symbols, and pages, and choose a page range to import. If the imported FreeHand file is in CMYK color mode, Flash converts the file to RGB.

Keep the following guidelines in mind when importing FreeHand files:

  • When importing a file with overlapping objects that you want to preserve as separate objects, place the objects on separate layers in FreeHand, and select Layers in the FreeHand Import dialog box in Flash when importing the file. (If overlapping objects on a single layer are imported into Flash, the overlapping shapes will be divided at intersection points, just as with overlapping objects that you create in Flash.)

  • When you import files with gradient fills, Flash can support up to eight colors in a gradient fill. If a FreeHand file contains a gradient fill with more than eight colors, Flash creates clipping paths to simulate the appearance of a gradient fill. Clipping paths can increase file size. To minimize file size, use gradient fills with eight colors or fewer in FreeHand.

  • When you import files with blends, Flash imports each step in a blend as a separate path. Thus, the more steps a blend has in a FreeHand file, the larger the imported file size will be in Flash.
    When you import files with strokes that have square caps, Flash converts the caps to round caps.

  • When you import files with placed grayscale images, Flash converts the grayscale images to RGB images. This conversion can increase the imported file's size.

  • When importing files with placed EPS images, you must select the Convert Editable EPS when Imported option in FreeHand Import Preferences before you place the EPS into FreeHand. If you do not select this option, the EPS image will not be viewable when imported into Flash. In addition, Flash does not display information for an imported EPS image (regardless of the Preferences settings used in FreeHand).

To import a FreeHand file:

  1. Select File > Import to Stage or File > Import to Library.

  2. In the Import dialog box, select FreeHand from the Files of Type (Windows) or Show (Macintosh) pop-up menu.

  3. Navigate to a FreeHand file and select it.

  4. Click Open.

  5. In the FreeHand Import Settings dialog box, for Mapping Pages, select a setting:

    Scenes converts each page in the FreeHand document to a scene in the Flash document.

    Keyframes converts each page in the FreeHand document to a keyframe in the Flash document.

  6. For Mapping Layers, select one of the following:

    Layers converts each layer in the FreeHand document to a layer in the Flash document.

    Keyframes converts each layer in the FreeHand document to a keyframe in the Flash document.

    Flatten converts all layers in the FreeHand document to a single flattened layer in the Flash document.

  7. For Pages, do one of the following:

    • Select All to import all pages from the FreeHand document.

    • Enter page numbers for From and To to import a page range from the FreeHand document.

  8. For Options, select any of the following options:

    Include Invisible Layers imports all layers (visible and hidden) from the FreeHand document.

    Include Background Layer imports the background layer with the FreeHand document.

    Maintain Text Blocks preserves text in the FreeHand document as editable text in the Flash document.

  9. Click OK.

 

Importing Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF files

TOP

Flash can import Adobe Illustrator files in version 10 or earlier, EPS files in any version, and PDF files in version 1.4 or earlier.

NOTE : The PDF version number is different from the Adobe Acrobat number. Adobe Acrobat is a product used to author PDF files. PDF is the file format.

When you import an Illustrator file into Flash, you must ungroup all the Illustrator objects on all layers. Once all the objects are ungrouped, they can be manipulated like any other Flash object.

You can also export Flash documents as Adobe Illustrator files. For information on exporting Illustrator files, see Adobe Illustrator.

You can choose from the following options when importing Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF files:

  • Convert pages to scenes or keyframes.

  • Convert layers to Flash layers or keyframes or flatten all layers.

  • Select which pages to import.

  • Include invisible layers.

  • Maintain text blocks.

  • Rasterize everything. Choosing this option flattens layers and rasterizes text, and disables options for converting layers or maintaining text blocks.

To import an Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF file:

  1. Select File > Import to Stage or Import to Library.

  2. In the Import dialog box, select Adobe Illustrator, EPS, or PDF from the Files of Type (Windows) or Show (Macintosh) pop-up menu.

  3. Navigate to a file and select it.

  4. Click Open.

    The Import Options dialog box appears.

  5. For Convert Pages, select one of the following:

    Screens (in screens mode) or Scenes (in scenes mode) converts each page to a screen or a scene.

    Keyframes converts each page to a keyframe.

  6. For Convert Layers, select one of the following:

    Layers converts each layer in the imported document to a layer in the Flash document.

    Keyframes converts each layer in the imported document to a keyframe in the Flash document.

    Flatten converts all layers in the imported document to a single flattened layer in the Flash document.

  7. For Which Pages to Import, select All to import all pages, or select From and enter a page range to import.

  8. For Options, select any of the following:

    Include Invisible Layers imports all layers (visible and hidden) from the imported document.

    Maintain Text Blocks imports text as editable text in Flash.

    Rasterize Everything converts all content in the imported document to bitmaps. Enter a value to set the resolution for the imported document. Selecting this option flattens all layers and disables the Maintain Text Blocks option.

  9. Click OK.

 

About AutoCAD DXF files

TOP

Flash supports the AutoCAD DXF format in AutoCAD 10.

DXF files do not support the standard system fonts. Flash tries to map fonts appropriately, but the results can be unpredictable, particularly for the alignment of text.

Since the DXF format does not support solid fills, filled areas are exported as outlines only. For this reason, the DXF format is most appropriate for line drawings, such as floor plans and maps.

You can import two-dimensional DXF files into Flash. Flash does not support three-dimensional DXF files.

Although Flash doesn't support scaling in a DXF file, all imported DXF files produce 12-inch x 12-inch files that you can scale using the Modify > Transform > Scale command. Also, Flash supports only ASCII DXF files. If your DXF files are binary, you must convert them to ASCII before importing them into Flash.

 

Working with imported bitmaps

TOP

When you import a bitmap into Flash, you can modify that bitmap and use it in your Flash document in a variety of ways. You can apply compression and anti-aliasing to imported bitmaps to control the size and appearance of bitmaps in your Flash applications. See Setting bitmap properties. You can apply an imported bitmap as a fill to an object. See Applying a bitmap fill.

Flash lets you break apart a bitmap into editable pixels. The bitmap retains its original detail but is broken into discrete areas of color. When you break a bitmap apart, you can select and modify areas of the bitmap with the Flash drawing and painting tools. Breaking apart a bitmap also lets you sample the bitmap with the Eyedropper tool to use it as a fill. See Breaking apart a bitmap.

You can edit an imported bitmap in Fireworks or another external image editor by starting the editing application from within Flash. See Editing bitmaps in an external editor. To convert a bitmap's image to a vector graphic, you can trace the bitmap. Performing this conversion enables you to modify the graphic as you do other vector artwork in Flash. See Converting bitmaps to vector graphics.

If a Flash document displays an imported bitmap at a larger size than the original, the image may be distorted. Preview imported bitmaps to be sure that images are displayed properly.

 

Using the Property inspector to work with bitmaps

TOP

When you select a bitmap on the Stage, the Property inspector displays the bitmap's symbol name and its pixel dimensions and position on the Stage. Using the Property inspector, you can assign a new name to the bitmap, and you can swap an instance of a bitmap--that is, replace the instance with an instance of another bitmap in the current document.

To display the Property inspector with bitmap properties:

  1. Select an instance of a bitmap on the Stage.

  2. Select Window > Properties.

To assign a new name to a bitmap:

  1. Select the bitmap in the Library panel.

  2. Select Window > Properties if the Property inspector is not visible. Select an instance of the bitmap on the Stage to view the bitmap properties.

  3. In the Property inspector, enter a new name in the Name text box.

  4. Click OK.

To replace an instance of a bitmap with an instance of another bitmap:

  1. Select a bitmap instance on the Stage.

  2. Select Window > Properties if the Property inspector is not visible.

  3. In the Property inspector, click Swap.

  4. In the Swap Bitmap dialog box, select a bitmap to replace the one currently assigned to the instance.

 

Setting bitmap properties

TOP

You can apply anti-aliasing to an imported bitmap to smooth the edges in the image. You can also select a compression option to reduce the bitmap file size and format the file for display on the web.

To select bitmap properties, you use the Bitmap Properties dialog box.

To set bitmap properties:

  1. Select a bitmap in the Library panel.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Click the properties icon at the bottom of the Library panel.

    • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the bitmap's icon and select Properties from the context menu.

    • Select Properties from the options menu in the upper right corner of the Library panel.

  3. In the Bitmap Properties dialog box, select Allow Smoothing to smooth the edges of the bitmap with anti-aliasing.

  4. For Compression, select one of the following options:

    Photo (JPEG) compresses the image in JPEG format. To use the default compression quality specified for the imported image, select Use Document Default Quality. To specify a new quality compression setting, deselect Use Document Default Quality and enter a value between 1 and 100 in the Quality text box. (A higher setting preserves greater image integrity but yields a larger file size.)

    Lossless (PNG/GIF) compresses the image with lossless compression, in which no data is discarded from the image.

    NOTE : Use Photo compression for images with complex color or tonal variations, such as photographs or images with gradient fills. Use Lossless compression for images with simple shapes and relatively few colors.

  5. Click Test to determine the results of the file compression. Compare the original file size to the compressed file size to determine if the selected compression setting is acceptable.

  6. Click OK.

NOTE : JPEG Quality settings that you select in the Publish Settings dialog box do not specify a quality setting for imported JPEG files. You must specify a quality setting for imported JPEG files in the Bitmap Properties dialog box.

 

Importing bitmaps at runtime

TOP

You can use the Action Script 2.0 command Bitmap Data to add bitmaps to a document at runtime. To do so, you must specify a linkage identifier for the bitmap.

To assign an identifier string to a bitmap:

  1. Select the bitmap in the Library panel.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Select Linkage from the options menu in the upper right corner of the panel.

    • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the bitmap name in the Library panel, and select Properties from the context menu.

    If the Linkage properties aren't visible in the Properties dialog box, click the Advanced button to display the advanced properties settings.

  3. Under Linkage in the Linkage Properties dialog box, select Export for Action Script.

  4. Enter an identifier string in the text box, and click OK.

 

Applying a bitmap fill

TOP

You can apply a bitmap as a fill to a graphic object using the Color Mixer. Applying a bitmap as a fill tiles the bitmap to fill the object. The Fill Transform tool allows you to scale, rotate, or skew an image and its bitmap fill.

To apply a bitmap as a fill using the Color Mixer:

  1. To apply the fill to existing artwork, select a graphic object or objects on the Stage.

  2. Select Window > Color Mixer.

  3. In the Color Mixer, select Bitmap from the pop-up menu in the center of the panel.

  4. If you need a larger preview window to display more bitmaps in the current document, click the arrow in the lower right corner to expand the Color Mixer.

  5. Click a bitmap to select it.

    The bitmap becomes the current fill color. If you selected artwork in step 1, the bitmap is applied as a fill to the artwork.

 

Editing bitmaps in an external editor

TOP

If you are editing a Fireworks PNG file imported as a flattened image, you can choose to edit the PNG source file for the bitmap, when available.

NOTE : You cannot edit bitmaps from Fireworks PNG files imported as editable objects in an external image editor.

If you have Fireworks 3 or later or another image-editing application installed on your system, you can start the application from within Flash to edit an imported bitmap.

To edit a bitmap with Fireworks 3 or later:

  1. In the Library panel, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the bitmap's icon.

  2. In the bitmap's context menu, select Edit with Fireworks 3.

  3. In the Edit Image dialog box, specify whether the PNG source file or the bitmap file is to be opened.

  4. Perform the desired modifications to the file in Fireworks.

  5. In Fireworks, select File > Update.

  6. Return to Flash.

The file is automatically updated in Flash.

To edit a bitmap with another image-editing application:

  1. In the Library panel, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the bitmap's icon.

  2. In the bitmap's context menu, select Edit With.

  3. Select an image-editing application to open the bitmap file, and click OK.

  4. Perform the desired modifications to the file in the image-editing application.

  5. Save the file in the image-editing application.

    The file is automatically updated in Flash.

  6. Return to Flash to continue editing the document.

 

Breaking apart a bitmap

TOP

Breaking apart a bitmap separates the pixels in the image into discrete areas that can be selected and modified separately. When you break apart a bitmap, you can modify the bitmap with the Flash drawing and painting tools. Using the Lasso tool with the Magic Wand modifier, you can select areas of a bitmap that has been broken apart.

You can paint with a broken-apart bitmap by selecting the bitmap with the Eyedropper tool and applying the bitmap as a fill with the Paint Bucket tool or another drawing tool.

To break apart a bitmap:

  1. Select a bitmap in the current scene.

  2. Select Modify > Break Apart.

To change the fill of selected areas of a broken-apart bitmap:

  1. Select the Lasso tool and click the Magic Wand modifier.

  2. Click the Magic Wand Settings modifier and set the following options:

    • For Threshold, enter a value between 1 and 200 to define how closely the color of adjacent pixels must match to be included in the selection. A higher number includes a broader range of colors. If you enter 0, only pixels of the exact same color as the first pixel you click are selected.

    • For Smoothing, select an option from the pop-up menu to define how much the edges of the selection will be smoothed.

  3. Click the bitmap to select an area. Continue clicking to add to the selection.

  4. Select the fill that you want to use to fill the selected areas in the bitmap.

  5. Select the Paint Bucket tool and click anywhere in the selected area to apply the new fill.

To apply a broken-apart bitmap as a fill using the Eyedropper tool:

  1. Select the Eyedropper tool and click the broken-apart bitmap on the Stage.

    The Eyedropper tool sets the bitmap to be the current fill and changes the active tool to the Paint Bucket.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Click an existing graphic object with the Paint Bucket tool to apply the bitmap as a fill.

    • Select the Oval, Rectangle, or Pen tool and draw a new object. The object is filled with the broken-apart bitmap.

You can use the Paint Bucket tool to scale, rotate, or skew the bitmap fill.

 

Converting bitmaps to vector graphics

TOP

The Trace Bitmap command converts a bitmap into a vector graphic with editable, discrete areas of color. This command lets you manipulate the image as a vector graphic; it is also useful if you want to reduce file size.

When you convert a bitmap to a vector graphic, the vector graphic is no longer linked to the bitmap symbol in the Library panel.

NOTE : If the imported bitmap contains complex shapes and many colors, the converted vector graphic may have a larger file size than the original bitmap. Try a variety of settings in the Trace Bitmap dialog box to find a balance between file size and image quality.

You can also break apart a bitmap in order to modify the image using Flash drawing and painting tools. See Breaking apart a bitmap.

To convert a bitmap to a vector graphic :

  1. Select a bitmap in the current scene.

  2. Select Modify > Bitmap > Trace Bitmap.

  3. Enter a Color Threshold value between 1 and 500.

    When two pixels are compared, if the difference in the RGB color values is less than the color threshold, the two pixels are considered the same color. As you increase the threshold value, you decrease the number of colors.

  4. For Minimum Area, enter a value between 1 and 1000 to set the number of surrounding pixels to consider when assigning a color to a pixel.

  5. For Curve Fit, select an option from the pop-up menu to determine how smoothly outlines are drawn.

  6. For Corner Threshold, select an option from the pop-up menu to determine whether sharp edges are retained or smoothed out.

    To create a vector graphic that looks most like the original bitmap, enter the following values:

    • Color Threshold: 10

    • Minimum Area: 1 pixel

    • Curve Fit: Pixels

    • Corner Threshold: Many Corners

 

Copyright ADOBE - All Rights Reserved Worldwide

 

 

More Topics:

Working with Flash Documents

How to work in Flash WorkSpace

Working with Projects in Flash

Process to Build your First Application in Flash

Using Symbols, Instances and Library Assets in Flash

How to Build Video Player in Flash

How to Work with Color, Strokes and Fills in Flash

How to Create Document in Flash

What is Vector and Bitmap Graphics in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 1

How to Work with Text in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 2

How to Use Imported Artwork in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 3

How to Work with Graphic Objects in Flash

How to Work with Layers in Flash

How to Use Filters and Blends

Working with Graphics in Flash

What is Accessibility Features in Flash

How to Create Motion (Shape Tween & Motion Tween) in Flash

How to Create an Application in Flash

What is Masking in Flash

How to Work with Video in Flash

How to Use Layout Tools in Flash

What are Behaviors in Flash

How to Work with Sound in Flash

How to Create Symbols and Instances in Flash

What is ActionScript in Flash

How to Write ActionScript With Script Assist in Flash

How to Add Button Animation and Navigation in Flash

What is Data Integration in Flash

How to Work with Screens

How to Create a Presentation with Screens

What is Extending Flash

How to Create Multilanguage Text in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Draw in Flash

What is Flash Lite

Ways of Data Integration

How to Create Graphics: Create a Timeline Animation in Flash

Getting Started with Flash Lite in Flash

How to Publish Flash Documents

How to Create Graphics: Making Animations with Easing

Learning Flash Lite 1.X ActionScript in Flash

How to Export Flash Content and Images from Flash

How to Create Graphics: Applying Gradients in Flash

Process of Writing and Editing ActionScript 2.0 in Flash

How to Create Accessible Content in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Apply Graphic Filters and Blends

What is Data and Data Types in Flash

Process of Printing from SWF Files in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Use Script Assist mode in Flash

Learn Syntax and Language Fundamentals in Flash

How to Create E-learning Content in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Write Scripts in Flash

Working with Functions and Methods in Flash

Process of Using Templates in Flash

Using ActionScript: Process of Adding Interactivity in Flash

What are Classes in Flash

Control Tag Summary of XML to UI in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Create a Form with Conditional Logic and Send Data in Flash

What is Inheritance in Flash

What is Data Integration: Overview

Using ActionScript: How to Work with Objects and Classes in Flash

Overview on Interfaces in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XML for a Timesheet

How to Work with Text and Strings in Flash

How to use Handling Events in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XUpdate to Update the Timesheet

Learning Animation, Filters and Drawings in Flash

How to Work with Movie Clips in Flash

How to Create Interaction with ActionScript in Flash

How to Work with Images, Sound, and Video in Flash

How to Work with External Data in Flash

What is Security in Flash

How to Debug Applications in Flash

List of Error Messages in Flash

Using Object-Oriented Programming with ActionScript 1.0 in Flash

How to Write Scripts for Earlier Versions of Flash Player in Flash

List of all Keyboard Keys and Key Code Values for using in Flash

Terminology

Introduction to Components in Flash

What are Components in Flash

How to Create an Application with Components

How to Work with Components in Flash

How to Handle Component Events in Flash

How to Customize Components in Flash

How to Create Components in Flash

What is Collection Properties in Flash