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Using Symbols, Instances and Library Assets in Flash

Types of symbols

About 9-slice scaling and movie clip symbols

Editing movie clip symbols with 9-slice scaling

Runtime bitmap caching movie clip and button symbols

About controlling instances and symbols with ActionScript

Creating symbols

Converting animation on the Stage into a movie clip

Duplicating symbols

Creating instances

Creating buttons

Enabling, editing, and testing buttons

Editing symbols

Changing instance properties

Changing the color and transparency of an instance

Swapping one instance for another

Changing an instance's type

Setting looping for graphic instances

Controlling instances with behaviors

Creating custom behaviors

Best practices for using behaviors

Comparing timeline code with object code

Using behaviors

Being consistent

Being courteous

Breaking apart instances

Getting information about instances on the Stage

Copying library assets between documents

Using shared library assets

Working with runtime shared assets

Defining runtime shared assets in a source document

Linking to runtime shared assets from a destination document

Updating or replacing symbols

Resolving conflicts between library assets

 

Types of symbols

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Each symbol has a unique Timeline and Stage, complete with layers. When you create a symbol you choose the symbol type, depending on how you want to use the symbol in your document.

  • Use graphic symbols for static images and to create reusable pieces of animation that are tied to the main Timeline. Graphic symbols operate in sync with the main Timeline. Interactive controls and sounds won't work in a graphic symbol's animation sequence.

  • Use button symbols to create interactive buttons that respond to mouse clicks, rollovers, or other actions. You define the graphics associated with various button states, and then assign actions to a button instance. For more information, see Handling Events in Learning ActionScript 2.0 in Flash.

  • Use movie clip symbols to create reusable pieces of animation. Movie clips have their own multiframe Timeline that is independent from the main Timeline--think of them as nested inside a main Timeline that can contain interactive controls, sounds, and even other movie clip instances. You can also place movie clip instances inside the Timeline of a button symbol to create animated buttons.

  • Use font symbols to export a font and use it in other Flash documents. See Creating font symbols.

  • Flash provides built-in components, movie clips with defined parameters, that you can use to add user interface elements, such as buttons, check boxes, or scroll bars, to your documents. For more information, see Introduction in Using Components.

    NOTE : To preview interactivity and animation in movie clip symbols in the Flash authoring environment, you must select Control > Enable Live Preview.

 

About 9-slice scaling and movie clip symbols

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You can use 9-slice scaling (Scale-9) to specify component-style scaling for movie clips. This lets you create movie clip symbols that scale appropriately for use as user interface components, as opposed to the type of scaling typically applied to graphics and design elements.

The movie clip is conceptually divided into nine sections with a grid-like overlay, and each of the nine areas is scaled independently. To maintain the visual integrity of the movie clip, corners are not scaled, while the remaining areas of the image are scaled (as opposed to being stretched) larger or smaller, as needed.

When a movie clip symbol has 9-slice scaling applied, it appears in the Library panel preview with the guides displayed. 9-slice scaling is visible only in the Test Movie window; you cannot view 9-slice scaling on the Stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing movie clip symbols with 9-slice scaling

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By default, slice guides are placed at 25% (or 1/4) of the symbol's width and height from the edge of the symbol. When you are in symbol-editing mode, the slice guides appear with dotted lines superimposed on the symbol on the main Stage. The guides do not appear when the symbol is in edit-in-place mode. Slice guides don't snap when you drag them in the workspace.

To enable 9-slice scaling for an existing movie clip symbol :

  1. With the source document open, select Window > Library to display the Library panel.
  2. Select a movie clip, button, or graphic symbol in the Library panel.
  3. Select Properties from the Library options menu.
  4. Select the Enable Guides for 9-slice Scaling check box.

    The slice guides are superimposed on the symbol on the Stage.\

To edit a movie clip symbol using 9-slice scaling :

  1. Enter symbol-editing mode by doing one of the following:
    • Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh), and select Edit from the context menu.
    • Select the symbol in the Library and right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh), and select Edit from the context menu.
    • Double-click the symbol in the Library.

    The slice-9 guides appear.

  2. Move the pointer over any of the four guides in the workspace to change the pointer to the horizontal or vertical guide pointers that indicate that a drag operation will move the position of the guide. Drag and release the pointer.

    The new position of the guide is updated in the library preview for the symbol.

 

Runtime bitmap caching movie clip and button symbols

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Runtime bitmap caching lets you optimize playback performance by specifying that a static movie clip (for example, a background image) or button symbol be cached as a bitmap at runtime. Caching a movie clip as a bitmap prevents Flash Player from having to continually redraw the image, which provides a significant improvement in playback performance.

For example, when creating animations with a complex background, you can create a movie clip for the background. The background is rendered as a bitmap stored at the current screen depth. It can be drawn very quickly, letting the animation play both faster and more smoothly, because the background doesn't need to continually be redrawn.

Without the use of bitmap caching, the animation might play back too slowly, because the background continually would be redrawn from vector data.

Bitmap caching lets you use a movie clip and "freeze" it in place automatically. If a region changes, Flash uses vector data to update the bitmap cache. This minimizes the number of redraws that Flash Player must perform, and provides smoother, faster playback performance.

Only use runtime bitmap caching on static, complex movie clips in which the position, but not the content, of the movie clip changes on each frame in an animation. You can only observe on complex-content movie clips the playback or runtime performance improvement in using runtime bitmap caching. You will not see the performance benefit of runtime bitmap caching when creating simple movie clips.

NOTE : You can only apply the Use Runtime Bitmap Caching check box to movie clip and button symbols.

Under the following circumstances, a movie clip will not use a bitmap (even if the Use Runtime Bitmap Caching check box is selected) and will instead render the movie clip or button symbol using vector data:

  • The bitmap is too large (greater than 2880 pixels in either direction).

  • The bitmap fails to allocate (producing an out of memory error).

  • The parent surface uses a vector clipper (the parent is partially rotated and scrolled).

To specify bitmap caching for a movie clip:

  1. Select the movie clip or button symbol on the Stage.

  2. In the symbol Property inspector, select the Use Runtime Bitmap Caching check box.

 

About controlling instances and symbols with ActionScript

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You can use ActionScript to control movie clip and button instances. The movie clip or button instance must have a unique instance name to be used with ActionScript. For information on assigning a name to an instance. You can also use ActionScript to control movie clip or button symbols. For more information.

 

Creating symbols

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You can create a symbol from selected objects on the Stage, or you can create an empty symbol and make or import the content in symbol-editing mode. You can also create font symbols in Flash. See Creating font symbols. Symbols can have all the functionality that you can create with Flash, including animation.

By using symbols that contain animation, you can create Flash applications with a lot of movement while minimizing file size. Consider creating animation in a symbol when there is a repetitive or cyclic action--the up-and-down motion of a bird's wings, for example.

You can also add symbols to your document by using shared library assets during authoring or at runtime. See Using shared library assets.

To convert selected elements to a symbol:

  1. Select an element or several elements on the Stage. Then do one of the following:

    • Select Modify > Convert to Symbol.

    • Drag the selection to the Library panel.

    • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Convert to Symbol from the context menu.

  2. In the Convert to Symbol dialog box, type the name of the symbol and select the behavior--Graphic, Button, or Movie Clip. See Types of symbols.

  3. Click in the registration grid to position the registration point for the symbol.

  4. (Optional) If you are creating a button or other component using movie clips, you can select the Enable Guides for 9-slice Scaling check box.

    Specifying 9-slice scaling lets you create movie clip symbols that scale appropriately for use as user interface components, as opposed to the type of scaling typically applied to graphics and design elements. For more information, see About 9-slice scaling and movie clip symbols.

  5. Click OK.

    Flash adds the symbol to the library. The selection on the Stage becomes an instance of the symbol. You cannot edit an instance directly on the Stage--you must open it in symbol-editing mode. You can also change the registration point for a symbol. See Editing symbols.

To create a new empty symbol :

  1. Make sure that nothing is selected on the Stage, and then do one of the following:

    • Select Modify > New Symbol.

    • Click the New Symbol button at the lower left of the Library panel.

    • Select New Symbol from the Library options menu in the upper right corner of the Library panel.

  2. In the Create New Symbol dialog box, type the name of the symbol and select the behavior--Graphic, Button, or Movie Clip. See Types of symbols.

  3. Click OK.

    Flash adds the symbol to the library and switches to symbol-editing mode. In symbol-editing mode, the name of the symbol appears above the upper left corner of the Stage, and a cross hair indicates the symbol's registration point.

  4. To create the symbol content, use the Timeline, draw with the drawing tools, import media, or create instances of other symbols.

  5. When you have finished creating the symbol content, do one of the following to return to document-editing mode:

    • Click the Back button at the left of the Edit bar above the Stage.

    • Select Edit > Edit Document.

    • Click the scene name in the Edit bar above the Stage.

    When you create a new symbol, the registration point is placed at the center of the window in symbol-editing mode. You can place the symbol contents in the window in relation to the registration point. You can also move the symbol contents in relation to the registration point when you edit a symbol, in order to change the registration point.

 

Converting animation on the Stage into a movie clip

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If you've created an animated sequence on the Stage and want to reuse it elsewhere in your document, or if you want to manipulate it as an instance, you can select it and save it as a movie clip symbol.

To convert animation on the Stage into a movie clip :

  1. On the main Timeline, select every frame in every layer of the animation on the Stage that you want to use. For information on selecting frames, see Using the Timeline in Getting Started with Flash.
  2. Do one of the following to copy the frames:
    • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) any selected frame and select Copy Frames from the context menu. Select Cut if you want to delete the sequence after converting it to a movie clip.
    • Select Edit > Timeline > Copy Frames. Select Cut Frames if you want to delete the sequence after converting it to a movie clip.
  3. Deselect your selection and make sure nothing on the Stage is selected. Select Modify > New Symbol.
  4. In the Create New Symbol dialog box, name the symbol. For Behavior, select Movie Clip, then click OK.

    Flash opens a new symbol for editing in symbol-editing mode.

  5. On the Timeline, click Frame 1 on Layer 1, and select Edit > Timeline > Paste Frames.
  6. This pastes the frames (and any layers and layer names) you copied from the main Timeline to the Timeline of this movie clip symbol. Any animation, buttons, or interactivity from the frames you copied now becomes an independent animation (a movie clip symbol) that you can reuse throughout your document.
    • When you have finished creating the symbol content, do one of the following to return to document-editing mode:
    • Click the Back button at the left of the Edit bar above the Stage.
    • Select Edit > Edit Document.
    • Click the scene name in the Edit bar above the Stage.

 

Duplicating symbols

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Duplicating a symbol lets you use an existing symbol as a starting point for creating a new symbol.

You can also use instances to create versions of the symbol with different appearances.

To duplicate a symbol using the Library panel :

  1. Select a symbol in the Library panel.

  2. Do one of the following to duplicate the symbol:

    • Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Duplicate from the context menu.

    • Select Duplicate from the Library options menu.

To duplicate a symbol by selecting an instance:

  1. Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage.

  2. Select Modify > Symbol > Duplicate Symbol.

    The symbol is duplicated and the instance is replaced with an instance of the duplicate symbol.

Creating instances

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After you create a symbol, you can create instances of that symbol wherever you like throughout your document, including inside other symbols. When you modify the symbol, Flash updates all instances of the symbol.

Flash gives movie clip and button instances default instance names when you create them. From the Property inspector, you can apply custom names to instances. You use the instance name to refer to an instance in ActionScript. You must give each instance a unique name in order to control it with ActionScript.

To create a new instance of a symbol :

  1. Select a layer in the Timeline.

    Flash can place instances only in keyframes, always on the current layer. If you don't select a keyframe, Flash adds the instance to the first keyframe to the left of the current frame.

    NOTE : A keyframe is a frame in which you define a change in the animation.

  2. Select Window > Library to open the library.
  3. Drag the symbol from the library to the Stage.
  4. If you created an instance of a graphic symbol, select Insert > Timeline > Frame to add the number of frames that will contain the graphic symbol.

To apply a custom name to an instance :

  1. Select the instance on the Stage.
  2. Select Window > Properties if the Property inspector is not visible.
  3. Enter a name in the Instance Name text box on the left side of the Property inspector (below the Symbol Behavior pop-up list).

After creating an instance of a symbol, you can use the Property inspector to specify color effects, assign actions, set the graphic display mode, or change the behavior of the instance. The behavior of the instance is the same as the symbol behavior, unless you specify otherwise. Any changes you make affect only the instance and not the symbol. See Changing instance


 

Creating buttons

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Buttons are actually four-frame interactive movie clips. When you select the button behavior for a symbol, Flash creates a Timeline with four frames. The first three frames display the button's three possible states; the fourth frame defines the active area of the button. The Timeline doesn't actually play; it simply reacts to pointer movement and actions by jumping to the appropriate frame.

To make a button interactive, you place an instance of the button symbol on the Stage and assign actions to the instance. You must assign the actions to the instance of the button in the document, not to frames in the button's Timeline.

Each frame in the Timeline of a button symbol has a specific function:

  • The first frame is the Up state, representing the button whenever the pointer is not over the button.

  • The second frame is the Over state, representing the button's appearance when the pointer is over the button.

  • The third frame is the Down state, representing the button's appearance as it is clicked.

  • The fourth frame is the Hit state, defining the area that responds to the mouse click. This area is invisible in the SWF file.

You can also create a button using a movie clip symbol or a button component. There are advantages to using each type of button, depending on your needs. Creating a button using a movie clip enables you to add more frames to the button or add more complex animation. However, movie clip buttons have a larger file size than button symbols. Using a button component allows you to bind the button to other components, to share and display data in an application. Button components also include prebuilt features, such as accessibility support, and can be customized. Button components include the PushButton and RadioButton.

To create a button:

  1. Select Edit > Deselect All to ensure that nothing is selected on the Stage.

  2. Select Insert > New Symbol, or press Control+F8 (Windows) or Command+F8 (Macintosh).

    To create the button, you convert the button frames to keyframes.

  3. In the Create New Symbol dialog box, enter a name for the new button symbol, and for Behavior select Button.

    Flash switches to symbol-editing mode. The Timeline header changes to display four consecutive frames labeled Up, Over, Down, and Hit. The first frame, Up, is a blank keyframe.

  4. To create the Up state button image, use the drawing tools, import a graphic, or place an instance of another symbol on the Stage.

    You can use a graphic or movie clip symbol in a button, but you cannot use another button in a button. Use a movie clip symbol if you want the button to be animated.

  5. Click the second frame, labeled Over, and select Timeline > Keyframe.

    Flash inserts a keyframe that duplicates the contents of the Up frame.

  6. Change the button image for the Over state.

  7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for the Down frame and the Hit frame.

    The Hit frame is not visible on the Stage, but it defines the area of the button that responds when clicked. Make sure that the graphic for the Hit frame is a solid area large enough toencompass all the graphic elements of the Up, Down, and Over frames. It can also be larger than the visible button. If you do not specify a Hit frame, the image for the Up state is used as the Hit frame.

  8. You can create a disjoint rollover, in which moving the pointer over a button causes another graphic on the Stage to change. To do this, you place the Hit frame in a different location than the other button frames.

  9. To assign a sound to a state of the button, select that state's frame in the Timeline, select Window > Properties, and then select a sound from the Sound menu in the Property inspector. For more information,

    When you finish, select Edit > Edit Document. Drag the button symbol from the Library panel to create an instance of it in the document.

Enabling, editing, and testing buttons

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By default, Flash keeps buttons disabled as you create them, to make it easier to select and work with them. When a button is disabled, clicking the button selects it. When a button is enabled, it responds to the mouse events that you've specified as if the SWF file were playing. You can still select enabled buttons, however. In general, it is best to disable buttons as you work, and enable buttons to quickly test their behavior.

To enable and disable buttons :

  • Select Control > Enable Simple Buttons. A check mark appears next to the command to indicate buttons are enabled. Select the command again to disable buttons.

    Any buttons on the Stage now respond. As you move the pointer over a button, Flash displays the Over frame; when you click within the button's active area, Flash displays the Down frame.

To select an enabled button :

  • Use the Selection tool to drag a selection rectangle around the button.

To move or edit an enabled button :

  1. Select the button, as described above.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Use the arrow keys to move the button.

    • If the Property inspector is not visible, select Window > Properties to edit the button in the Property inspector, or Alt-double-click (Windows) or Option-double-click the button (Macintosh).

To test a button, do one of the following :

  • Select Control > Enable Simple Buttons. Move the pointer over the enabled button to test it.

  • Select the button in the Library panel and click the Play button in the Library preview window.

  • Select Control > Test Scene or Control > Test Movie.

Movie clips in buttons are not visible in the Flash authoring environment.

 

Editing symbols

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When you edit a symbol, Flash updates all the instances of that symbol in your document. Flash provides three ways for you to edit symbols. You can edit the symbol in context with the other objects on the Stage using the Edit in Place command. Other objects are dimmed to distinguish them from the symbol you are editing. The name of the symbol you are editing is displayed in an Edit bar at the top of the Stage, to the right of the current scene name.

You can also edit a symbol in a separate window, using the Edit in New Window command. Editing a symbol in a separate window lets you see the symbol and the main Timeline at the same time. The name of the symbol you are editing is displayed in the Edit bar at the top of the Stage.

You edit the symbol by changing the window from the Stage view to a view of only the symbol, using symbol-editing mode. The name of the symbol you are editing is displayed in the Edit bar at the top of the Stage, to the right of the current scene name.When you edit a symbol, Flash updates all instances of the symbol throughout the document to reflect your edits. While editing a symbol, you can use any of the drawing tools, import media, or create instances of other symbols.

You can change the registration point of a symbol (the point identified by the coordinates 0, 0) using any symbol-editing method.

To edit a symbol in place:

  1. Do one of the following:

    • Double-click an instance of the symbol on the Stage.

    • Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh), and select Edit in Place from the context menu.

    • Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and select Edit > Edit in Place.

  2. Edit the symbol as needed.

  3. To change the registration point, drag the symbol on the Stage. A cross hair indicates the location of the registration point.

  4. To exit edit-in-place mode and return to document-editing mode, do one of the following:

    • Click the Back button at the left of the Edit bar at the top of the Stage.

    • Select the current scene name from the Scene pop-up menu in the Edit bar at the top of the Stage.

    • Select Edit > Edit Document.

To edit a symbol in a new window:

  1. Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh), and select Edit in New Window from the context menu.

  2. Edit the symbol as needed.

  3. To change the registration point, drag the symbol on the Stage. A cross hair indicates the location of the registration point.

  4. Click the Close box in the upper right corner (Windows) or upper left corner (Macintosh) to close the new window, and click in the main document window to return to editing the main document.

To edit a symbol in symbol-editing mode:

  1. Do one of the following to select the symbol:

    • Double-click the symbol's icon in the Library panel.

    • Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Edit from the context menu.

    • Select an instance of the symbol on the Stage and select Edit > Edit Symbols.

    • Select the symbol in the Library panel and select Edit from the Library options menu, or right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the symbol in the Library panel and select Edit from the context menu.

  2. Edit the symbol as needed on the Stage.

  3. To change the registration point, drag the symbol on the Stage. A cross hair indicates the location of the registration point.

  4. To exit symbol-editing mode and return to editing the document, do one of the following:

    • Click the Back button at the left of the Edit bar at the top of the Stage.

    • Select Edit > Edit Document.

    • Click the scene name in the Edit bar at the top of the Stage.

Changing instance properties

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Each symbol instance has its own properties that are separate from the symbol. You can change the tint, transparency, and brightness of an instance; redefine how the instance behaves (for example, change a graphic to a movie clip); and specify how animation plays inside a graphic instance. You can also skew, rotate, or scale an instance without affecting the symbol.

In addition, you can name a movie clip or button instance so that you can use ActionScript to change its properties. For more information, see Classes in Learning ActionScript 2.0 in Flash. To edit instance properties, you use the Property inspector (Windows > Properties).

The properties of an instance are saved with it. If you edit a symbol or relink an instance to a different symbol, any instance properties you've changed still apply to the instance.

 

Changing the color and transparency of an instance

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Each instance of a symbol can have its own color effect. To set color and transparency options for instances, you use the Property inspector. Settings in the Property inspector also affect bitmaps placed within symbols.

When you change the color and transparency for an instance in a specific frame, Flash makes the change as soon as it displays that frame. To make gradual color changes, you must apply a motion tween. When tweening color, you enter different effect settings in starting and ending keyframes of an instance, and then tween the settings to make the instance's colors shift over time.

Tweening gradually changes an instance's color or transparency.

NOTE :If you apply a color effect to a movie clip symbol that has multiple frames, Flash applies the effect to every frame in the movie clip symbol.

To change the color and transparency of an instance:

  1. Select the instance on the Stage and select Window > Properties.

  2. In the Property inspector, select one of the following options from the Color pop-up menu:

Brightness adjusts the relative lightness or darkness of the image, measured on a scale from black (-100%) to white (100%). Click the triangle and drag the slider or enter a value in the text box to adjust brightness.

Tint colors the instance with the same hue. Use the Tint slider in the Property inspector to set the tint percentage, from transparent (0%) to completely saturated (100%). Click the triangle and drag the slider or enter a value in the text box to adjust tint. To select a color, enter red, green, and blue values in the respective text boxes, or click the color box and select a color from the pop-up window or click the Color Picker button.

Alpha adjusts the transparency of the instance, from transparent (0%) to completely saturated (100%). To adjust the alpha value, click the triangle and drag the slider or enter a value in the text box.

Advanced separately adjusts the red, green, blue, and transparency values of an instance. This is most useful when you want to create and animate subtle color effects on objects such as bitmaps. The controls on the left let you reduce the color or transparency values by a specified percentage. The controls on the right let you reduce or increase the color or transparency values by a constant value.

The current red, green, blue, and alpha values are multiplied by the percentage values, and then added to the constant values in the right column, producing the new color values. For example, if the current red value is 100, setting the left slider to 50% and the right slider to 100 produces a new red value of 150 ([100 x .5] + 100 = 150).

NOTE : The Advanced settings in the Effect panel implement the function (a * y+ b)= x where a is the percentage specified in the left set of text boxes, y is the color of the original bitmap, b is the value specified in the right set of text boxes, and x is the resulting effect (between 0 and 255 for RGB, and 0 and 100 for alpha transparency).

Swapping one instance for another

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You can assign a different symbol to an instance to display a different instance on the Stage and preserve all the original instance properties, such as color effects or button actions.

For example, suppose you're creating a cartoon with a rat symbol for your character, but decide to change the character to a cat. You could replace the rat symbol with the cat symbol and have the updated character appear in roughly the same location in all your frames.

To assign a different symbol to an instance:

  1. Select the instance on the Stage and select Window > Properties.

  2. Click the Swap button in the Property inspector.

  3. In the Swap Symbol dialog box, select a symbol to replace the one currently assigned to the instance. To duplicate a selected symbol, click the Duplicate Symbol button at the bottom of the dialog box.

    Duplicating lets you base a new symbol on an existing one in the library and minimizes copying if you're making several symbols that differ just slightly.

  4. Click OK.

To replace all instances of a symbol :

  1. Drag a symbol with the same name as the one you are replacing into the Library panel.

  2. In the Resolve Library Item Conflict dialog box, click Replace.

    For more information, see Resolving conflicts between library assets.

Changing an instance's type

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You can change an instance's type to redefine its behavior in a Flash application. For example, if a graphic instance contains animation that you want to play independently of the main Timeline, you could redefine the graphic instance as a movie clip instance.

To change an instance's type:

  1. Select the instance on the Stage and select Window > Properties.

  2. Select Graphic, Button, or Movie Clip from the pop-up menu in the upper left corner of the Property inspector.

 

Setting looping for graphic instances

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You can determine how animation sequences inside a graphic instance play in your Flash application by setting options in the Property inspector.

An animated graphic symbol is tied to the Timeline of the document in which the symbol is placed. In contrast, a movie clip symbol has its own independent Timeline. Animated graphic symbols, because they use the same Timeline as the main document, display their animation in document-editing mode. Movie clip symbols appear as static objects on the Stage and do not appear as animations in the Flash editing environment.

To set the looping of a graphic instance :

  1. Select a graphic instance on the Stage and select Window > Properties.

  2. In the Property inspector, select an animation option from the pop-up menu below the instance name:

    Loop loops all the animation sequences contained in the current instance for as many frames as the instance occupies.

    Play Once plays the animation sequence beginning from the frame you specify to the end of the animation and then stops.

    Single Frame displays one frame of the animation sequence. Specify which frame to display.

 

Controlling instances with behaviors

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You can use behaviors to control movie clip and graphic instances in a document without writing ActionScript. Behaviors are prewritten ActionScript scripts that let you add the power, control, and flexibility of ActionScript coding to your document without having to create the ActionScript code yourself.

You can use behaviors with an instance to arrange it in the stacking order on a frame, as well as to load or unload, play, stop, duplicate, or drag a movie clip, or to link to a URL.
In addition, you can use behaviors to load an external graphic or an animated mask into a movie clip.

To control a movie clip with a behavior, you use the Behaviors panel to apply the behavior to a triggering object, such as a button. You specify the event that triggers the behavior (such as releasing the button), select a target object (the movie clip instance) that is affected by the behavior, and when necessary, specify settings for the behavior parameters, such as a frame number or label.

The behaviors in the following table are packaged with Flash Basic 8 and Flash Professional 8. For more information on embedded video behaviors, see Controlling video playback using behaviors. For more information on controlling sounds with behaviors, see Controlling sound playback using behaviors.

Behavior

Purpose

Select/input

Load Graphic
 

Loads an external JPEG file into a movie clip or screen.
 

Path and filename of JPEG file.
 

Instance name of movie clip or screen receiving the graphic.

Load External Movie Clip

Loads an external SWF file into a target movie clip or screen.

URL of external SWF file.

Instance name of movie clip or screen receiving the SWF file.

Duplicate Movieclip
 


Duplicates a movie clip or screen

Instance name of movie clip to duplicate.

X-offset and Y-offset of pixels from original to copy.

GotoAndPlay at frame or label
 


Plays a movie clip from a particular frame.

Instance name of target clip to play.

Frame number or label to play.

GotoAndStop at frame or label
 


Stops a movie clip, optionally moving the playhead to a particular frame.

Instance name of target clip to stop.

Frame number or label to stop.

Bring to Front


Brings target movie clip or screen to the top of the stacking order.

Instance name of movie clip or screen.

Bring Forward


Brings target movie clip or screen one position higher in the stacking order.

Instance name of movie clip or screen.

Send to Back


Sends the target movie clip to the bottom of the stacking order.

Instance name of movie clip or screen.

Send Backward


Sends the target movie clip or screen one position lower in the stacking order.

Instance name of movie clip or screen.

Start Dragging movieclip

Starts dragging a movie clip.

Instance name of movie clip or screen.

Stop Dragging movieclip

Stops the current drag.

To add and configure a behavior:

  1. Select the object, such as a button, that will trigger the behavior.

  2. In the Behaviors panel (Window > Behaviors), click the Add (+) button and select the desired behavior from the Movieclip submenu.

  3. In the dialog box that appears, select the movie clip that you want to control with the behavior.

  4. Select a relative or absolute path.

  5. If required, select or input settings for the behavior parameters and click OK.

    Default settings for the behavior appear in the Behaviors panel.

  6. Under Event, click On Release (the default event) and select a mouse event from the menu. If you want to use the On Release event, leave the option unchanged.

 

Creating custom behaviors

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You can write your own custom behaviors that serve your own needs. To do this, you create an XML file that contains the ActionScript code needed to perform the desired behavior, and save the file in the Behaviors folder of your local computer. Behaviors are stored in the following location:

  • Windows: C:\Documents and Settings\user name\Local Settings\Application Data\Adobe\Flash\language\Configuration\BehaviorsMacintosh:

  • Macintosh HD/Users/user name/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Flash/language/Configuration/Behaviors/

Before creating your own behaviors, examine the various Behavior XML files to develop an understanding of the syntax of the XML files, as well as the ActionScript code used to create behaviors. If you are new to writing behaviors, you should become familiar with the XML tags used to create user interface elements (such as dialog boxes), and with ActionScript, the coding language used to create behaviors.

To create a custom behavior:

  1. Using an XML editor, create a new XML file, and name it appropriately for the behavior you intend to create.
    NOTE : You may want to open an existing behavior's XML file and save it using a new filename. This gives you a template with which to create your custom behavior.

  2. Enter a category name.

    This creates a category in the Behaviors panel under which the behavior is listed.

    <behavior_definition dialogID="Trigger-dialog" category="myCategory"

    authoringEdition="pro" name="behaviorName" >

  3. Enter a name for the behavior.

    This parameter defines the name that will be listed in the Behaviors panel.

    <behavior_definition dialogID="Trigger-dialog" category="myCategory"

    authoringEdition="pro" name="behaviorName" >

  4. If the behavior relies on features available in only the Professional edition of Flash 8, specify pro for the authoringEdition parameter.

  5. (Optional) If your custom behavior require a dialog box, enter parameters using the <properties> and <dialog> tags.

    To learn about the tags and parameters used to create your own custom dialog boxes, see XML to UI.

  6. In the <actionscript> tag, insert the ActionScript code to create the behavior you want to create.

    If you are new to ActionScript, see Learning ActionScript 2.0 in Flash.

    For example:

    <actionscript>
    <![CDATA[
    // Trigger Data Source Behavior
    // Adobe 2003
    $TARGET$.trigger();
    ]]>
    </actionscript>

  7. Save the file.

  8. Test the behavior.

Best practices for using behaviors

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Behaviors are prewritten code snippets that can be instantly added to parts of a FLA file. The introduction of behaviors has added to the complexity of determining best practices in Flash, because the way some behaviors are added does not follow typical and ideal workflows. Many developers usually enter ActionScript either into one or several frames on the main Timeline or in external ActionScript files, which is a good practice to follow. However, when you use behaviors, sometimes code is placed directly on symbol instances (such as buttons, movie clips, or components) instead of being placed on the Timeline.

Behaviors are convenient, save substantial time, and can be useful for novice Flash and ActionScript users. Before you start using behaviors, take a close look at how you want to structure your FLA file:

  • What behaviors do you need for your project?

  • What code do the behaviors contain?

  • How are you are going to use and implement behaviors?

  • What other ActionScript do you need to add?

If you carefully plan a document that uses behaviors, you can avoid problems that could be created by decentralizing your ActionScript.

 

Comparing timeline code with object code

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Planning a project and organizing a document or application cannot be underestimated, particularly when you are creating large involved projects or working in teams. This is why the placement of ActionScript--often what makes the project work--is important.

Many developers do not place ActionScript on symbol instances, and instead place their code on the Timeline (timeline code) or in classes. Because Behaviors add code to many locations in a FLA file, it means that your ActionScript is not centralized and can be difficult to locate. When code is not centralized, it is difficult to figure out interactions between the snippets of code, and it is impossible to write code in an elegant way. It can potentially lead to problems debugging code or editing files. Many developers also avoid placing code on different frames on the Timeline or avoid placing timeline code inside multiple movie clips where it is hidden. By placing all your code, including functions that must be defined before they are used, in a SWF file, you can avoid such problems.

Flash has features that make it easy to work with behaviors in a document and with decentralized ActionScript. If you use behaviors, try the following features when working on your project:

Script navigator Makes your timeline code or code on individual objects easy to find and edit in the Actions panel.

Find and replace Lets you search for strings and replace them in a FLA document.

Script pinning Lets you pin multiple scripts from various objects and work with them simultaneously in the Actions panel. This works best with the Script navigator.

Movie Explorer Lets you view and organize the contents of a FLA file and select elements (including scripts) for further modification.

 

Using behaviors

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Knowing when to use behaviors is the most important guideline. Carefully consider your project and whether behaviors are the best solution for you, which can be determined by answering the questions that follow. Consider different ways of structuring your projects, as well as the different options and features available in Flash.

If you have a FLA file with symbols, you can select one of the instances on the Stage, and then use the Add menu on the Behaviors panel to add a behavior to that instance. The behavior you select automatically adds code that attaches to the instance, using code such as the on() handler. You can also select a frame on the Timeline, or a slide or form in a screen-based FLA file, and add different behaviors to a frame or screen using the Behaviors panel.

You need to decide when you need to use behaviors instead of writing ActionScript. First, answer the questions in the introductory section Best practices for using behaviors. Examine how and where you want to use behaviors and ActionScript in your FLA file. Then, consider the following questions:

  • Do you have to modify the behavior code? If so, by how much?

  • Do you have to interact with the behavior code with other ActionScript?

  • How many behaviors do you have to use, and where do you plan to put them in the FLA file?

Your answers to these questions determine whether you should use behaviors. If you want to modify the behavior code to any extent, do not use behaviors. Behaviors usually cannot be edited using the Behaviors panel if you make modifications to the ActionScript. And if you plan to significantly edit the behaviors in the Actions panel, it is usually easier to write all of the ActionScript yourself in a centralized location. Debugging and modifications are easier to make from a central location than having code generated by behaviors placed in many areas around your FLA file. Debugging and interaction can be inelegant or difficult with scattered code, and sometimes it is easier to write the ActionScript yourself.

The main difference between a FLA file with behaviors and a FLA file without behaviors is the workflow you must use for editing the project. If you use behaviors, you must select each instance on the Stage, or select the Stage, and open the Actions or Behaviors panel to make modifications. If you write your own ActionScript and put all your code on the main Timeline, you only have to go to the Timeline to make your changes.

Use behaviors consistently throughout a document when they are your main or only source of ActionScript. It is best to use behaviors when you have little or no additional code in the FLA file, or have a consistent system in place for managing the behaviors that you use.

 

Being consistent

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There are some guidelines for using behaviors; the main thing is consistency. If you add ActionScript to a FLA file, put code in the same locations where behaviors are added, and document how and where you add code.

For example, if you place code on instances on the Stage, on the main Timeline, and in class files, you should examine your file structure. Your project will be difficult to manage, because the code placement is inconsistent. However, if you logically use behaviors and structure your code to work in a particular way surrounding those behaviors (place everything on object instances), your workflow is logical and consistent. The document will be easier to modify later.

 

Being courteous

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If you plan to share your FLA file with other users and you use ActionScript placed on or inside objects (such as movie clips), it can be difficult for those users to find your code's location, even when they use the Movie Explorer to search through the document.

If you are creating a FLA file that has code placed in many locations throughout the document, and plan to share the file, it is courteous to notify other users that you are using ActionScript that is placed in or on objects. This courtesy ensures that other users immediately understand the structure of the file. Leave a comment on Frame 1 on the main Timeline to tell users where to find the code and how the file is structured. The following example shows a comment that tells users the location of the ActionScript:

/*
On Frame 1 of main Timeline.
ActionScript placed on component instances and inside movie clips using behaviors.
Use Movie Explorer to locate ActionScript
*/

NOTE : It is not necessary to use this technique if your code is easy to find, the document is not shared, or all of your code is placed on frames of the main Timeline.

Clearly document the use of behaviors if you are working with a complex document. If you keep track of where you use behaviors, you might have fewer headaches in the long run. Perhaps you can create a flow chart or list, or use good documentation comments in a central location on the main

 

Breaking apart instances

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To break the link between an instance and a symbol and make the instance into a collection of ungrouped shapes and lines, you "break apart" the instance. This is useful for changing the instance substantially without affecting any other instance. If you modify the source symbol after breaking apart the instance, the instance is not updated with the changes.

To break apart an instance of a symbol:

  1. Select the instance on the Stage.
  2. Select Modify > Break Apart.

    This breaks the instance into its component graphic elements.

  3. Use the painting and drawing tools to modify these elements as desired.
Getting information about instances on the Stage

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As you create a Flash application, it can be difficult to identify a particular instance of a symbol on the Stage, particularly if you are working with multiple instances of the same symbol. You can identify instances using the Property inspector, the Info panel, or the Movie Explorer.

The Property inspector and Info panel display the symbol name of the selected instance and an icon that indicates its type--graphic, button, or movie clip. In addition, you can view the following information:

  • In the Property inspector, you can view the instance's behavior and settings--for all instance types, color effect settings, location, and size; for graphics, the loop mode and first frame that contains the graphic; for buttons, the instance name (if assigned) and tracking option; for movie clips, the instance name (if assigned). For location, the Property inspector displays the x and y coordinates of either the symbol's registration point or the symbol's upper left corner, depending on which option is selected in the Info panel.

  • In the Info panel, you can view the instance's size and location; the location of its registration point; its red (R), green (G), blue (B), and alpha (A) values (if the instance has a solid fill); and the location of the pointer. The Info panel also displays the x and y coordinates of either the symbol's registration point or the symbol's upper left corner, depending on which option is selected. To display the coordinates of the registration point, click the center square in the Coordinate grid in the Info panel. To display the coordinates of the upper left corner, click the upper left square in the Coordinate grid.

  • In the Movie Explorer, you can view the contents of the current document, including instances and symbols. See Using the Movie Explorer.

In addition, in the Actions panel, you can view any actions assigned to a button or movie clip.

To get information about an instance on the Stage:

  1. Select the instance on the Stage.

  2. Display the Property inspector or panel you want to use:

    • To display the Property inspector, select Window > Properties.

    • To display the Info panel, select Window > Info.

    • To display the Movie Explorer, select Window > Movie Explorer. For more information on the Movie Explorer, see Using the Movie Explorer.

    • To display the Actions panel, select Window > Actions.

To view the symbol definition for the selected symbol in the Movie Explorer:

  1. Click the Show Buttons, Movie Clips, and Graphics button at the top of the Movie Explorer.

  2. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Show Symbol Instances and Go to Symbol Definition from the context menu; or select these options from the pop-up menu in the upper right corner of the Movie Explorer.

To jump to the scene containing instances of a selected symbol:

  1. Display the symbol definitions as described in the previous procedure.

  2. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Show Movie Elements and Go to Symbol Definition from the context menu; or select these options from the pop-up menu in the upper right corner of the Movie Explorer.

 

Copying library assets between documents

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You can copy library assets from a source document into a destination document in a variety of ways: by copying and pasting the asset, by dragging and dropping the asset, or by opening the library of the source document in the destination document and dragging the source document assets into the destination document.

You can also share symbols between documents as shared library assets during authoring or at runtime.

If you attempt to copy assets that have the same name as existing assets in the destination document, the Resolve Library Conflicts dialog box lets you choose whether to overwrite the existing assets or to preserve the existing assets and add the new assets with modified names.You can organize library assets in folders to minimize name conflicts when copying assets between documents.

To copy a library asset by copying and pasting:

  1. Select the asset on the Stage in the source document.

  2. Select Edit > Copy.

  3. Make the destination document the active document.

  4. Place the pointer on the Stage and select Edit > Paste in Center to paste the asset in the center of the visible work area. Select Edit > Paste in Place to place the asset in the same location as in the source document.

To copy a library asset by dragging:

  1. With the destination document open in Flash, select the asset in the Library panel in the source document.

  2. Drag the asset into the Library panel in the destination document.

To copy a library asset by opening the source document library in the destination document:

  1. With the destination document active in Flash, select File > Import > Open External Library.

  2. Select the source document in the Open As Library dialog box and click Open.

  3. Drag an asset from the source document library onto the Stage or into the library of the destination document.

Using shared library assets

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Shared library assets let you use assets from a source document in multiple destination documents.You can share library assets in two different ways:

  • For runtime shared assets, assets from a source document are linked as external files in a destination document. Runtime assets are loaded into the destination document during document playback--that is, at runtime. The source document containing the shared asset does not need to be available on your local network when you author the destination document. However, the source document must be posted to a URL in order for the shared asset to be available to the destination document at runtime.

  • For shared assets during authoring, you can update or replace any symbol in a document you are authoring with any other symbol available on your local network. You can update the symbol in the destination document as you author the document. The symbol in the destination document retains its original name and properties, but its contents are updated or replaced with those of the symbol you select.

Using shared library assets can optimize your workflow and document asset management in numerous ways. For example, you can use shared library assets to share a font symbol across multiple sites, provide a single source for elements in animations used across multiple scenes or document, or create a central resource library to use for tracking and controlling revisions.

 

Working with runtime shared assets

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Using runtime shared library assets involves two procedures: First, the author of the source document defines a shared asset in the source document and enters an identifier string for the asset and a URL where the source document will be posted.

Second, the author of the destination document defines a shared asset in the destination document and enters an identifier string and URL identical to those used for the shared asset in the source document. Alternatively, the destination document author can drag the shared assets from the posted source document into the destination document library.

In either scenario, the source document must be posted to the specified URL in order for the shared assets to be available for the destination document.

 

Defining runtime shared assets in a source document

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You use the Symbol Properties dialog box or the Linkage Properties dialog box to define sharing properties for an asset in a source document, to make the asset accessible for linking to destination documents.

To define a runtime shared asset in a source document:

  1. With the source document open, select Window > Library to display the Library panel.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Select a movie clip, button, or graphic symbol in the Library panel and select Properties from the Library options menu. Click the Advanced button to expand the Properties dialog box.
    • Select a font symbol, sound, or bitmap and select Linkage from the Library options menu.
  3. For Linkage, select Export for Runtime Sharing to make the asset available for linking to the destination document.
  4. Enter an identifier for the symbol in the Identifier text field. Do not include spaces. This is the name Flash uses to identify the asset when linking to the destination document.
    NOTE : Flash also uses the linkage identifier to identify a movie clip or button that is used as an object in ActionScript.
  5. Enter the URL where the SWF file containing the shared asset will be posted.
  6. Click OK

Linking to runtime shared assets from a destination document

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You use the Symbol Properties dialog box or the Linkage Properties dialog box to define sharing properties for an asset in a destination document so that you can link the asset to a shared asset in a source document. If the source document is posted to a URL, you can also link a shared asset to a destination document by dragging the asset from the source document to the destination document.

To embed a symbol, bitmap, or sound in the destination document, you can turn off sharing for a shared asset in the destination document.

To link a shared asset to a destination document by entering the identifier and URL:

  1. In the destination document, select Window > Library to display the Library panel.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Select a movie clip, button, graphic symbol, bitmap, or sound in the Library panel and select Properties from the Library options menu. Click the Advanced button to expand the Properties dialog box.

    • Select a font symbol and select Linkage from the Library options menu.

  3. For Linkage, select Import for Runtime Sharing to link to the asset in the source document.

  4. Enter an identifier for the symbol, bitmap, or sound in the Identifier text field that is identical to the identifier used for the symbol in the source document. Do not include spaces.

  5. Enter the URL where the SWF source file containing the shared asset is posted.

  6. Click OK.

To link a shared asset to a destination document by dragging:

  1. In the destination document, do one of the following:

    • Select File > Open.

    • Select File > Import > Open External Library.

  2. In the Open or Open as Library dialog box, select the source document and click Open.

  3. Drag the shared asset from the source document Library panel into the Library panel or onto the Stage in the destination document.

To turn off linkage for a symbol in a destination document:

  1. In the destination document, select the linked symbol in the Library panel and do one of the following:

    • If the asset is a movie clip, button, or graphic symbol, select Properties from the Library options menu.

    • If the asset is a font symbol, select Linkage from the Library options menu.

  2. In the Symbol Properties dialog box or the Linkage Properties dialog box, deselect Import for Runtime Sharing.

  3. Click OK.

Updating or replacing symbols

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You can update or replace a movie clip, button, or graphic symbol in a document with any other symbol in a FLA file accessible on your local network. The original name and properties of the symbol in the destination document are preserved, but the contents of the symbol are replaced with the contents of the symbol you select. Any assets that the selected symbol uses are also copied into the destination document.

To update or replace a symbol:

  1. With the document open, select a movie clip, button, or graphic symbol and select Properties from the Library options menu.

  2. If the Symbol Properties dialog box is in basic mode, click Advanced to display the Linkage and Source panels. If the Linkage and Source panel are open, go to Step 3.

  3. To select a new FLA file, under Source in the Symbol Properties dialog box, click Browse.

  4. In the Open dialog box, navigate to a FLA file containing the symbol that will be used to update or replace the selected symbol in the Library panel, and click Open.

  5. To select a new symbol in the FLA file, under Source, click Symbol.

  6. Navigate to a symbol and click Open.

  7. In the Symbol Properties dialog box, under Source, select Always Update Before Publishing to automatically update the asset if a new version is found at the specified source location.

  8. Click OK to close the Symbol Properties or Linkage Properties dialog box.

Resolving conflicts between library assets

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If you import or copy a library asset into a document that already contains a different asset of the same name, you can choose whether to replace the existing item with the new item. This option is available with all the methods for importing or copying library assets, including the following:

  • Copying and pasting an asset from a source document

  • Dragging an asset from a source document or a source document library

  • Importing an asset

  • Adding a shared library asset from a source document

  • Using a component from the Components panel

The Resolve Library Items dialog box appears when you attempt to place items that conflict with existing items in a document. A conflict exists when you copy an item from a source documentthat already exists in the destination document and the items have different modification dates. You can avoid naming conflicts by organizing your assets inside folders in your document's library. The dialog box also appears when you paste a symbol or component into your document's Stage and you already have a copy of the symbol or component that has a different modification date from the one you're pasting.

If you choose not to replace the existing items, Flash attempts to use the existing item instead of the conflicting item that you are pasting. For example, if you copy a symbol named Symbol 1 and paste the copy into the Stage of a document that already contains a symbol named Symbol 1, Flash creates an instance of the existing Symbol 1.

If you choose to replace the existing items, Flash replaces the existing items (and all their instances) with the new items of the same name. If you cancel the Import or Copy operation, the operation is canceled for all items (not just those items that conflict in the destination document).

Only identical library item types may be replaced with each other. That is, you cannot replace a sound named Test with a bitmap named Test. In such cases, the new items are added to the library with the word Copy appended to the name.

NOTE : Replacing library items using this method is not undoable. Be sure to save a backup of your FLA file before performing complex paste operations that are resolved by replacing conflicting library items.

If the Resolve Library Conflict dialog box appears when you are importing or copying library assets into a document, you can resolve the naming conflict.

To resolve naming conflicts between library assets, do one of the following:

  • Click Don't Replace Existing Items to preserve the existing assets in the destination document.

  • Click Replace Existing Items to replace the existing assets and their instances with the new items of the same name.

Copyright ADOBE - All Rights Reserved Worldwide

 

 

More Topics:

Working with Flash Documents

How to work in Flash WorkSpace

Working with Projects in Flash

Process to Build your First Application in Flash

Using Symbols, Instances and Library Assets in Flash

How to Build Video Player in Flash

How to Work with Color, Strokes and Fills in Flash

How to Create Document in Flash

What is Vector and Bitmap Graphics in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 1

How to Work with Text in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 2

How to Use Imported Artwork in Flash

How to Create a Banner in Flash, Part 3

How to Work with Graphic Objects in Flash

How to Work with Layers in Flash

How to Use Filters and Blends

Working with Graphics in Flash

What is Accessibility Features in Flash

How to Create Motion (Shape Tween & Motion Tween) in Flash

How to Create an Application in Flash

What is Masking in Flash

How to Work with Video in Flash

How to Use Layout Tools in Flash

What are Behaviors in Flash

How to Work with Sound in Flash

How to Create Symbols and Instances in Flash

What is ActionScript in Flash

How to Write ActionScript With Script Assist in Flash

How to Add Button Animation and Navigation in Flash

What is Data Integration in Flash

How to Work with Screens

How to Create a Presentation with Screens

What is Extending Flash

How to Create Multilanguage Text in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Draw in Flash

What is Flash Lite

Ways of Data Integration

How to Create Graphics: Create a Timeline Animation in Flash

Getting Started with Flash Lite in Flash

How to Publish Flash Documents

How to Create Graphics: Making Animations with Easing

Learning Flash Lite 1.X ActionScript in Flash

How to Export Flash Content and Images from Flash

How to Create Graphics: Applying Gradients in Flash

Process of Writing and Editing ActionScript 2.0 in Flash

How to Create Accessible Content in Flash

How to Create Graphics: Apply Graphic Filters and Blends

What is Data and Data Types in Flash

Process of Printing from SWF Files in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Use Script Assist mode in Flash

Learn Syntax and Language Fundamentals in Flash

How to Create E-learning Content in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Write Scripts in Flash

Working with Functions and Methods in Flash

Process of Using Templates in Flash

Using ActionScript: Process of Adding Interactivity in Flash

What are Classes in Flash

Control Tag Summary of XML to UI in Flash

Using ActionScript: How to Create a Form with Conditional Logic and Send Data in Flash

What is Inheritance in Flash

What is Data Integration: Overview

Using ActionScript: How to Work with Objects and Classes in Flash

Overview on Interfaces in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XML for a Timesheet

How to Work with Text and Strings in Flash

How to use Handling Events in Flash

What is Data Integration: Using XUpdate to Update the Timesheet

Learning Animation, Filters and Drawings in Flash

How to Work with Movie Clips in Flash

How to Create Interaction with ActionScript in Flash

How to Work with Images, Sound, and Video in Flash

How to Work with External Data in Flash

What is Security in Flash

How to Debug Applications in Flash

List of Error Messages in Flash

Using Object-Oriented Programming with ActionScript 1.0 in Flash

How to Write Scripts for Earlier Versions of Flash Player in Flash

List of all Keyboard Keys and Key Code Values for using in Flash

Terminology

Introduction to Components in Flash

What are Components in Flash

How to Create an Application with Components

How to Work with Components in Flash

How to Handle Component Events in Flash

How to Customize Components in Flash

How to Create Components in Flash

What is Collection Properties in Flash