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Explore Work Area in Photoshop

Getting familiar with the work area

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The Photoshop and ImageReady work area is arranged to help you focus on creating and editing images.



Photoshop work area A. Menu bar B. Options bar C. Toolbox D. Active image area E. Palette well F. Palettes
 
 

About the work area

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The work area consists of the following components:

Menu bar
The menu bar contains menus for performing tasks. The menus are organized by topic. For example, the Layers menu contains commands for working with layers.

Options bar
The options bar provides options for using a tool.

Toolbox
The toolbox holds tools for creating and editing images.

Palette well (Photoshop)
The palette well helps you organize the palettes in your work area.

Palettes
Palettes help you monitor and modify images.

 

Using the toolbox

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The first time you start the application, the toolbox appears on the left side of the screen. Some tools in the toolbox have options that appear in the context-sensitive tool options bar. These include the tools that let you use type, select, paint, draw, sample, edit, move, annotate, and view images. Other tools in the toolbox allow you to change foreground/background colors, go to Adobe Online, work in different modes, and jump between Photoshop and ImageReady applications.


Using the options bar

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Most tools have options that are displayed in the options bar. The options bar is context sensitive and changes as different tools are selected. Some settings in the options bar are common to several tools (such as painting modes and opacity), and some are specific to one tool (such as the Auto Erase setting for the Pencil tool).

You can move the options bar anywhere in the work area using the gripper bar, and dock it at the top or bottom of the screen. Tool tips appear when you hold the pointer over a tool.

    Lasso options bar A. Gripper bar B. Tool tip

To view tool options in the options bar:

    Do one of the following:

    • Choose Window > Options.
    • Click a tool in the toolbox.

To return a tool or all tools to the default settings:

    Do one of the following:

    • Click the tool icon on the options bar, and then choose Reset Tool or Reset All Tools from the context menu.
    • (ImageReady) In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > General, and then click Reset All Tools. In Mac OS, choose ImageReady > Preferences > General, and then click Reset All Tools.

To move the options bar:

    Drag the options bar by the gripper bar at its left edge.


 

Using the palette well

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    The Photoshop options bar includes a palette well that helps you organize and manage palettes. The palette well stores, or docks, palettes that you use frequently, without having to keep them open on the work area.

    The palette well is available only when using a screen resolution greater than 800 pixels x 600 pixels (a setting of at least 1024 x 768 is recommended).

To dock palettes in the palette well:

    Drag the palette's tab into the palette well so that the palette well is highlighted.

      Docking a palette in the palette well

    To use a palette in the palette well:

      Click the palette's tab. The palette remains open until you click outside it or click in the palette's tab.


      Docked palette in the palette well

Using tool presets (Photoshop)

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You can load, edit, and create libraries of tool presets using the Tool Preset picker in the options bar, the Tool Presets palette, and the Preset Manager. You can also save and reuse tool settings using tool presets.

    Viewing the Tool Preset picker A. Click the Tool Preset picker in the options bar to show the Tool Preset pop-up palette. B. Select a preset to change the tool's options to the preset settings, which will apply each time you select the tool (until you choose Reset Tool from the palette menu). C. Uncheck to show all tool presets; check to show presets for only the tool selected in the toolbox.

To create a tool preset:

  1. Choose a tool, and set the options you want to save as a tool preset in the options bar.
  2. Click the Tool Preset button on the left side of the options bar, or choose Window > Tool Presets to display the Tool Presets palette.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • Click the Create New Tool Preset button .
    • Choose New Tool Preset from the palette menu.
  4. Enter a name for the tool preset, and click OK.

To choose a tool preset:

    Do one of the following:

    • Click the Tool Preset picker in the options bar, and select a preset from the pop-up palette.
    • Choose Window > Tool Presets, and select a preset.

To change the list of presets in the Tool Preset pop-up palette:

    Do one of the following:

    • To show all loaded presets, choose Show All Tool Presets from the palette menu.
    • To sort the presets by tool, choose Sort By Tool from the palette menu.
    • To show only the loaded presets for the active tool, choose Show Current Tool Presets from the palette menu, or click the Current Tool Only button.
    • To create, load, and manage libraries of tool presets,
    • To change the display of presets in the pop-up palette, choose Text Only, Small Text, or Large Text from the palette menu.

 

Using palettes

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Palettes help you monitor and modify images. You can choose which palettes are visible. By default, palettes appear stacked together in groups. You can move palette groups, rearrange palettes in their groups, and remove palettes from groups.

Palettes can also be docked to keep them organized

 
Using context menus

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In addition to the menus at the top of your screen, context menus display commands relevant to the active tool, selection, or palette.


Viewing the context menu for using the Eyedropper tool

To display context menus:

  1. Position the pointer over an image or palette item.
  2. Click with the right mouse button (Windows) or Control-click  (Mac OS). The context menu appears where you clicked.
     
Viewing images

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You can change the screen display mode to change the appearance of the Photoshop or Image Ready work area. The Hand tool, the zoom tools, the Zoom commands, and the Navigator palette let you view different areas of an image at different magnifications. You can open additional windows to display several views at once (such as different magnifications) of an image.

 
Correcting mistakes

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    Most operations can be undone if you make a mistake. Alternatively, you can restore all or part of an image to its last saved version. But available memory may limit your ability to use these options.

    For information on how to restore your image to how it looked at any point in the current work session,

To undo the last operation:

    Choose Edit > Undo.

    If an operation can't be undone, the command is dimmed and changes to Can't Undo.

To redo the last operation:

    Choose Edit > Redo.

    You can set the Redo keystroke preference to be the same for Photoshop and ImageReady. In the General area of the Preferences dialog box, select a preference for the Redo key. You can also set the key to toggle between Undo and Redo.

To free memory used by the Undo command, the History palette, or the Clipboard (Photoshop):

    Choose Edit > Purge, and choose the item type or buffer you want to clear. If already empty, the item type or buffer is dimmed.

    Important: The Purge command permanently clears from memory the operation stored by the command or buffer; it cannot be undone. For example, choosing Edit > Purge > Histories deletes all history states from the History palette. Use the Purge command when the amount of information held in memory is so large that Photoshop's performance is noticeably diminished.

To revert to the last saved version:

    Choose File > Revert.

    Note: Revert is added as a history state in the History palette and can be undone.

To restore part of an image to its previously saved version (Photoshop):

    Do one of the following:

    • Use the History Brush tool  to paint with the selected state or snapshot on the History palette.
    • Use the Eraser tool with the Erase to History option selected.
    • Select the area you want to restore, and choose Edit > Fill. For Use, choose History, and click OK.

    Note: To restore the image with a snapshot of the initial state of the document, choose History Options from the Palette menu and make sure that the Automatically Create First Snapshot option is on.

 

About the History palette

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The History palette lets you jump to any recent state of the image created during the current working session. Each time you apply a change to an image, the new state of that image is added to the palette.

For example, if you select, paint, and rotate part of an image, each of those states is listed separately in the palette. You can then select any of the states, and the image will revert to how it looked when that change was first applied. You can then work from that state.

 
Duplicating images

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    You can duplicate an entire image (including all layers, layer masks, and channels) into available memory without saving to disk. In ImageReady, you can also duplicate optimized versions of an image.

    Using duplicates in ImageReady lets you experiment and then compare several versions of the optimized image to the original.

To duplicate an image (Photoshop):

  1. Open the image you want to duplicate.
  2. Choose Image > Duplicate.
  3. Enter a name for the duplicated image.
  4. If you want to duplicate the image without merging the layers, select Duplicate Merged Layers Only.
  5. Click OK.

    To duplicate an image in Photoshop and automatically append the name "copy" to its filename, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when you choose Image > Duplicate.

To duplicate an original image (ImageReady):

  1. Open the image you want to duplicate.
  2. Select the Original tab at the top of the image window.
  3. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag the Original tab from the image window, or choose Image > Duplicate.
  4. Name the duplicate, specify whether to flatten the layers, and click OK.

To duplicate an optimized image (ImageReady):

  1. Open the image you want to duplicate.
  2. Select the Optimized tab at the top of the image window.
  3. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag the Optimized tab from the image window, or choose Image > Duplicate Optimized.
  4. Name the duplicate, and click OK.

    Note: When you duplicate an image in Optimized, 2-Up, or 4-Up view, the duplicate image appears in the Original view in the duplicate image window. If you want a duplicate optimized image to appear in the Optimized, 2-Up, or 4-Up view, duplicate the original image, and then select the Optimized, 2-Up, or 4-Up tab in the duplicate image window.

 

Using rulers, columns, the Measure tool, guides, and the grid

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Rulers, columns, the Measure tool, guides, and the grid help you position images or elements precisely across the width or length of an image.

Note: You can also align and distribute parts of an image using the Layers palette.

 
Working with Extras

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    Guides, grid, target paths, selection edges, slices, image maps, text bounds, text baselines, text selections, and annotations are nonprinting Extras that help you select, move, or edit images and objects. You can turn on or off an Extra or any combination of Extras without affecting the image. You can also show or hide Extras by choosing the Extras command in the View menu.

To show Extras:

    Choose View > Extras. A check mark appears next to all shown Extras in the Show submenu.

    Note: Choosing Extras also shows color samplers, even though color samplers are not an option in the Show submenu.

To hide Extras:

    With Extras showing, choose View > Extras. A dot (Windows) or a dash (Mac OS) appears next to all hidden Extras in the Show submenu.

    Note: Hiding only suppresses the display of Extras. It does not turn off these options.

To show one Extra from a list of hidden Extras:

    Choose View > Show and choose an Extra from the submenu. Choosing one of the hidden Extras will cause it to show, and turn off all other Extras.

To turn on and off a group of Extras:

    Choose View > Show > All to turn on and show all available Extras. Choose View > Show > None to turn off all Extras.

 

Displaying status information (Photoshop)

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    The status bar at the bottom of the window displays useful information--such as the current magnification and file size of the active image, and brief instructions for using the active tool.

To show or hide the status bar (Windows only):

    Choose Window > Status Bar. A check mark indicates the item is showing.

 
Displaying file and image information

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    Information about the current file size and other features of the image is displayed at the bottom of the application window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS).

    Note: In ImageReady, if the document window is wide enough, two image information boxes appear, enabling you to view two different information options for the image at the same time. For more information about original and optimized images,

    You can also view copyright and authorship information that has been added to the file. This information includes standard file information and Digimarc watermarks. Photoshop automatically scans opened images for watermarks using the Digimarc Detect Watermark plug-in. If a watermark is detected, Photoshop displays a copyright symbol in the image window's title bar and updates the Copyright & URL area of the File Info dialog box.

To display file information in the document window (Photoshop):

  1. Click the triangle in the bottom border of the application window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS).

    Illustration of file information view options in Photoshop
    1. Select a view option:
      • Document Size to display information on the amount of data in the image. The number on the left represents the printing size of the image--approximately the size of the saved, flattened file in Adobe Photoshop format. The number on the right indicates the file's approximate size including layers and channels.
      • Document Profile to display the name of the color profile used by the image.
      • Document Dimensions to display the dimensions of the image.
      • Scratch Sizes to display information on the amount of RAM and scratch disk used to process the image. The number on the left represents the amount of memory that is currently being used by the program to display all open images. The number on the right represents the total amount of RAM available for processing images.
      • Efficiency to display the percentage of time actually doing an operation instead of reading or writing the scratch disk. If the value is below 100%, Photoshop is using the scratch disk and, therefore, is operating more slowly.
      • Timing to display the amount of time it took to complete the last operation.
      • Current Tool to view the name of the active tool.

    To display image information in the document window (ImageReady):
     

    1. Click an image information box at the bottom of the document window.
    2. Select a view option:
      • Original/Optimized File Size to view the original and optimized file size images. The first value indicates the original image file size. The second value (present if the original image has been optimized) indicates the optimized image file size and file format based on the current settings in the Optimize palette.
      • Optimized Information to view the file format, file size, number of colors, and dither percentage for the optimized image.
      • Image Dimensions to view the image's pixel dimensions.
      • Watermark Strength to view the strength of the Digimarc digital watermark in the optimized image, if present.
      • Undo/Redo Status to view the number of undos and redos that are available for the image.
      • Original in Bytes to view the size of the original, flattened image expressed in bytes.
      • Optimized in Bytes to view the size of the optimized image expressed in bytes.
      • Optimized Savings to view the percentage of the optimized image file size reduction, followed by the difference in bytes between the original and optimized sizes.
      • Size/Download Time to view the file size for the optimized image and estimated download time using the selected modem speed.

      Note: Download times may vary based on Internet traffic and modem compression schemes. The value displayed is an approximation.

    To view additional file information:

      Choose File > File Info.

    To read a Digimarc watermark:
     

    1. Choose Filter > Digimarc > Read Watermark. If the filter finds a watermark, a dialog box displays the Creator ID, copyright year (if present), and image attributes.
    2. Click OK, or for more information, choose from the following:
      • If you have a Web browser installed, click Web Lookup to get more information about the owner of the image. This option launches the browser and displays the Digimarc Web site, where contact details appear for the given Creator ID.
      • Call the phone number listed in the Watermark Information dialog box to get information faxed back to you.

 

Annotating images (Photoshop)

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You can attach note annotations (notes) and audio annotations to an image in Photoshop. This is useful for associating review comments, production notes, or other information with the image. Because Photoshop annotations are compatible with Adobe Acrobat, you can use them to exchange information with Acrobat users as well as Photoshop users.

To circulate a Photoshop document for review in Acrobat, save the document in Portable Document Format (PDF) and ask reviewers to use Acrobat to add notes or audio annotations. Then import the annotations into Photoshop.

Notes and audio annotations appear as small nonprintable icons on the image. They are associated with a location on the image rather than with a layer. You can hide and show annotations, open notes to view or edit their contents, and play audio annotations. You can also add audio annotations to actions, and set them to play during an action or during a pause in an action.

 
Jumping between applications

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You can jump between Photoshop and ImageReady to transfer an image between the two applications for editing without closing or exiting the originating application. In addition, you can jump from ImageReady to other graphics editing applications and HTML editing applications installed on your system.

Jumping to an application saves you from having to close the file in one application and reopen it in another application

 

Previewing an image in a browser

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    To get an idea of how an optimized image will look in a Web page, you can preview the image in any browser installed on your system. The browser displays the image with a caption listing the image's file type, pixel dimensions, file size, and compression specifications in the first paragraph, and filename and other HTML information in the second paragraph. You can add additional browsers to the menu, and specify which browser will be launched when using a keyboard shortcut.

To add a browser:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Choose File > Save for Web, and then choose Edit List from the Select Browser menu  . Click the Add button in the Browsers dialog box.
    • (ImageReady) Choose File > Preview In > Edit Browser List. Click the Add button in the Edit Browsers List dialog box.
  2. In the Preview in Other Browser dialog box, navigate to the browser application on your computer, and then click the Open button. The browser name appears in the Browsers dialog box.

To add all browsers on your computer:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Choose File > Save for Web, and then choose Edit List from the Select Browser menu  . Click the Find All button. All the browsers installed on your computer appear. Click the OK button.
    • (ImageReady) Choose File > Preview In > Edit Browser List. Click the Find All button. All the browsers installed on your computer appear. Click the OK button.

To preview an optimized image in a browser:

    Do one of the following:

    • (Photoshop) Choose File > Save for Web, and then choose the browser you want to use from the Select Browser menu. (Choose Other to select a browser not listed in the submenu.) You can also click the Preview In button  to display the image in the default browser.
    • (ImageReady) Choose File > Preview In, and then choose an option from the submenu (choose Other to select a browser not listed in the submenu), or select a browser from the Preview in Browser tool in the toolbox.

 

Managing libraries with the Preset Manager (Photoshop)

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The Preset Manager centralizes management of brushes, swatches, gradients, styles, patterns, contours, custom shapes, and preset tools. You can use the Preset Manager to change the current set of preset items and create new libraries. Once you load a library in the Preset Manager, you can access the library's items in all locations that the type of preset is available, such as the options bar, Styles palette, Gradient Editor dialog box, and so on.

When you make a change to most presets, Photoshop prompts you to save the changed item as a new preset when you close the image file. This way you won't lose any existing or new presets.


 

    Illustration of rearranging tool presets in the Preset Manager

To display the Preset Manager:

    Choose Edit > Preset Manager.

To switch between preset types:

    Choose an option from the Preset Type pop-up menu.

To change how items are displayed:

    Click the arrow and choose one of the following:

    • Text Only to display the name of each preset item.
    • Small Thumbnail or Large Thumbnail to display a thumbnail of each preset item. (These options are not available for tool presets.)
    • Small List or Large List to display the name and thumbnail of each preset item. (These options are not available for swatch presets.)
    • Stroke Thumbnail to display a sample brush stroke and brush thumbnail of each brush preset. (This option is available for brush presets only.)

To load a library of preset items:

    Do one of the following:

    • Choose a library file from the bottom of the palette menu. Click OK to replace the current list, or click Append to append the current list.
    • To add a library to the current list, click Load, select the library file you want to add, and click Load.
    • To replace the current list with a different library, choose Replace Preset Type from the palette menu. Select the library file you want to use, and click Load.

    Note: Each type of library has its own file extension and default folder in the Presets folder in the Photoshop program folder.

To rename presets items:

  1. Select a preset item. Shift-click to select multiple items:
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Click Rename, and then enter a new name for the brush, swatch, and so on.
    • If the Preset Manager is set to display presets as thumbnails, double-click a preset, enter a new name, and click OK.
    • If the Preset Manager is set to display presets as a list or text only, double-click a preset, enter a new name inline, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

To rearrange preset items:

    Drag an item up or down in the list.

To delete preset items:

    Do one of the following:

    • Select a preset item, and click Delete.
    • Alt-click (Windows) or Options-click (Mac OS) the items you want to delete.

To create a new library of presets:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To save all the presets in the list as a library, make sure that no items are selected.
    • To save a subset of the current list as a library, hold down Shift, and select the items you want to save.
  2. Click Save Set, choose a location for the library, enter a filename, and click Save.

    You can save the library anywhere. However, if you place the library file in the appropriate Presets folder inside the Photoshop program folder, the library name will appear at the bottom of the palette menu after you restart Photoshop.

To return to the default library of preset items:

    Choose Reset Preset Type from the palette menu. You can either replace the current list or append the default library to the current list.

Customizing keyboard shortcuts

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Photoshop provides a set of default keyboard shortcuts for commands and tools. However, you can customize keyboard shortcuts to your liking. You can change individual shortcuts within a set, and define your own sets of shortcuts.


Click a command row and enter a shortcut key in the empty text box to add a new shortcut.

To define new shortcuts:

  1. Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts.
  2. Choose a set of shortcuts from the Set menu at the top of the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box (Photoshop Defaults is the only option until you create a new set).
  3. Choose a shortcut type (Application Menus, Palette Menus, or Tools) from the Shortcuts For menu.
  4. In the Shortcut column of the scroll list, select the shortcut you want to modify.
  5. Type a new shortcut. After you make changes, the name in the Set menu is suffixed with (modified).

    If the keyboard shortcut is already assigned to another command or tool in the set, an alert informs you that another command or tool has the shortcut. Click Accept to assign the shortcut to the new command or tool, and to erase the previously assigned shortcut. Once you have reassigned a shortcut, you can click Undo Changes to undo the change, or click Accept and Go to Conflict to go to the other command or tool and assign it a new shortcut.

  6. When you have finished changing shortcuts, do one of the following:
    • To discard all changes and exit the dialog box, click Cancel.
    • To discard the last saved change without closing the dialog box, click Undo.
    • To return a new shortcut to the default, click Use Default.
    • To export the displayed set of shortcuts, click Summarize. You can use this HTML file to display in a Web browser.

To define a new set of shortcuts:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To create a new set before you change default shortcuts, click the New Set button  before you begin changing shortcuts.
    • To create a new set that includes any modifications you've made, click the New Set button  after you're done changing shortcuts.
  2. Save the shortcuts as a file. Enter a name for the new set in the Name text box, and click Save. The new key set will appear in the pop-up menu under the new name.

To clear shortcuts from a command or tool:

  1. Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts.
  2. In the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, select the command or tool name whose shortcut you want to delete.
  3. Click Delete Shortcut.

To delete an entire set of shortcuts:

  1. Choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts.
  2. In the Set pop-up menu, choose the shortcut set that you want to delete.
  3. Click the Delete Set button and then OK to exit the dialog box.
 
Setting preferences

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    Numerous program settings are stored in Adobe Photoshop CS Prefs file. Among the settings stored in this file are general display options, file-saving options, cursor options, transparency options, and options for plug-ins and scratch disks. Most of these options are set in the Preferences dialog box. Preference settings are saved each time you exit the application.

    Unexpected behavior may indicate damaged preferences. By removing damaged preferences, you can restore preferences to their default settings.

To open a preferences dialog box:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences and choose the desired preference set from the submenu.
    • (Photoshop) In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences and choose the desired preference set from the submenu.
    • (ImageReady) In Mac OS, choose ImageReady > Preferences and choose the desired preference set from the submenu.
  2. To switch to a different preference set, do one of the following:
    • Choose the preference set from the menu at the top of the dialog box.
    • Click Next to display the next preference set in the menu list; click Prev to display the previous preference set.

    For information on a specific preference option, see the Index.

To restore all preferences to their default settings:

    Do one of the following:

    • Press and hold Alt+Control+Shift (Windows) or Option+Command+Shift (Mac OS) immediately after launching Photoshop or ImageReady. You will be prompted to delete the current settings.
    • In Mac OS, open the Preferences folder in the Library folder, and drag the Adobe Photoshop CS Settings folder to the Trash.

    New Preferences files will be created the next time you start Photoshop or ImageReady.

 
Resetting all warning dialogs

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    Sometimes messages containing warnings or prompts regarding certain situations are displayed. You can disable the display of these messages by selecting the Don't Show Again option in the message. You can also globally reset the display of all messages that have been disabled.

To reset the display of all warning messages (Photoshop):

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > General.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences > General.
  2. Click Reset All Warning Dialogs, and click OK.

To turn on or off warning messages (ImageReady):

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > General.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences > General.
  2. Deselect or select Disable Warnings, and click OK.
 
Monitoring operations

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    A progress bar indicates that an operation is in process. You can interrupt the process or have the program notify you when it has finished.

To cancel operations:

    Hold down Esc until the operation in progress has stopped. In Mac OS, you can also press Command+period.

To set notification for completion of operations:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > General.
    • (Photoshop) In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences > General.
    • (ImageReady) In Mac OS, choose ImageReady > Preferences > General.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Select Beep When Done.
    • (ImageReady) Select Notify When Done and choose (Mac OS only): System Alert to use your system alert for notification or Text to Speech to use a spoken notification.
  3. Click OK.
 
Closing files and quitting

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    Closing and quitting is simple. Always make sure that you've saved any changes to your images before you close images and quit Photoshop or ImageReady.

To close a file:

  1. Choose File > Close or File > Close All.
  2. Choose whether or not to save the file:
    • Click Yes (Windows) or Save (Mac OS) to save the file.
    • Click No (Windows) or Don't Save (Mac OS) to close the file without saving it.

To exit Photoshop or ImageReady:

  1. Choose File > Exit (Windows) or File > Quit (Mac OS).
  2. Choose whether or not to save any open files:
    • Click Yes (Windows) or Save (Mac OS) for each open file to save the file.
    • Click No (Windows) or Don't Save (Mac OS) for each open file to close the file without saving it.
 
Using plug-in modules

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    Plug-in modules are software programs developed by Adobe Systems and by other software developers in conjunction with Adobe Systems to add features to Photoshop and ImageReady. A number of importing, exporting, and special-effects plug-ins come with your program; they are automatically installed in folders inside the Photoshop Plug-ins folder.

    You can select an additional plug-ins folder to use compatible plug-ins stored with another application. You can also create a shortcut (Windows) or an alias (Mac OS) for a plug-in stored in another folder on your system. You can then add the shortcut or alias to the Plug-ins folder to use that plug-in with Photoshop and ImageReady.

    Once installed, plug-in modules appear as options added to the Import or Export menu; as file formats in the Open, Save As, and Export Original (ImageReady) dialog boxes; or as filters in the Filter submenus. Photoshop and ImageReady can accommodate a large number of plug-ins. However, if the number of installed plug-in modules becomes great enough, Photoshop or ImageReady may not be able to list all the plug-ins in their appropriate menus. Newly installed plug-ins will then appear in the Filter > Other submenu.

To install an Adobe Systems plug-in module:

    Do one of the following:

    • Use the plug-in installer, if provided.
    • (Windows) Copy the module into the appropriate Plug-ins folder in the Photoshop program folder. Make sure that the files are uncompressed.
    • (Mac OS) Drag a copy of the module to the appropriate Plug-ins folder in the Photoshop program folder. Make sure that the files are uncompressed.

    Important: In Mac OS, you cannot launch Photoshop in the Classic environment. Plug-ins originally intended to work on Mac OS 9 won't appear.

To install a third-party plug-in module:

    Follow the installation instructions that came with the plug-in module.

    If you cannot run a third-party plug-in, the plug-in may require a legacy Photoshop serial number.

To specify a legacy serial number (Photoshop):

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > Plug-Ins & Scratch Disk.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Plug-Ins & Scratch Disk.
  2. Enter the serial number from Photoshop 6.0 or earlier in the Legacy Photoshop Serial Number text box.

To select an additional plug-ins folder:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Plug-Ins & Scratch Disk.
    • (ImageReady) In Mac OS, choose ImageReady > Preferences > Plug-Ins & Scratch Disk.
  2. Select Additional Plug-ins Folder.
  3. Click Choose, and select a folder or directory from the list. Make sure that you do not select a location inside the Plug-ins folder. To display the contents of a folder, double-click the directory (Windows) or click Open (Mac OS).
  4. When you have highlighted the additional plug-ins folder, click OK (Windows) or Choose (Mac OS).
  5. Restart Photoshop or ImageReady for the plug-ins to take effect.

To suppress the loading of a plug-in or folder of plug-ins:

    Add a tilde ~ character at the beginning of the plug-in name, folder, or directory. That file (or all files in the folder) will be ignored by the application.

To view information about installed plug-ins:

    Do one of the following:

    • In Windows, choose Help > About Plug-In and select a plug-in from the submenu.
    • (Photoshop) In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > About Plug-In and select a plug-in from the submenu.
    • (ImageReady) In Mac OS, choose ImageReady > About Plug-In and select a plug-in from the submenu.

To load a plug-in in only Photoshop or ImageReady:

    Install the plug-in either the Adobe Photoshop Only folder or the Adobe ImageReady Only folder inside the Plug-ins folder.

    Note: Use this procedure when you want to use a plug-in within only Photoshop or ImageReady, or when a plug-in may only be compatible with one of the two applications.

 
Working with Adobe Version Cue managed projects

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Adobe Version Cue is an innovative set of features designed to increase your productivity when you work alone or collaborate with others. Adobe Version Cue integrates design management into your existing workflows within and across the Adobe Creative Suite applications, including Adobe GoLive CS, Adobe Illustrator CS, Adobe InDesign CS, and Adobe Photoshop CS.

Note: The Adobe Version Cue features are compatible only with the Adobe Version Cue Workspace, which is available only as part of the Adobe Creative Suite.

Adobe Version Cue streamlines the following tasks while you work in the Creative Suite:

    • Creating file versions
    • Maintaining file security
    • Organizing files into private or shared projects
    • Browsing with file thumbnails, and searching file information and version comments
    • Reviewing file information, comments, and file statuses in private and shared projects while you brows

    In addition, you can use the Version Cue Workspace Administration for more advanced tasks:

    • Duplicate, export, backup and restore projects.
    • View information about projects in the workspace.
    • Import files to the workspace using FTP or WebDAV.
    • Delete file versions and remove file locks.
    • Create project users and define their project privileges.
    • Restrict access to a specific project.

    To view the complete Adobe Version Cue documentation, You can also view the Adobe Version Cue documentation as a PDF or print it by opening the VersionCueHelp.pdf file located on the Adobe Creative Suite CD and the Adobe Photoshop CS CD.

 
Assigning scratch disks

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    When your system does not have enough RAM to perform an operation, Photoshop and ImageReady use a proprietary virtual memory technology, also called scratch disks. A scratch disk is any drive or a partition of a drive with free memory. By default, Photoshop and ImageReady use the hard drive that the operating system is installed on as its primary scratch disk.

    You can change the primary scratch disk and, in Photoshop, designate a second, third, or fourth scratch disk to be used when the primary disk is full. Your primary scratch disk should be your fastest hard disk, and should have plenty of defragmented space available.

    The following guidelines can help you assign scratch disks:

    • For best performance, scratch disks should be on a different drive than any large files you are editing.
    • Scratch disks should be on a different drive than the one used for virtual memory.
    • Scratch disks should be on a local drive. That is, they should not be accessed over a network.
    • Scratch disks should be conventional (non-removable) media.
    • Raid disks/disk arrays are good choices for dedicated scratch disk volumes.
    • Drives with scratch disks should be defragmented regularly.

To change the scratch disk assignment:

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Plug-Ins & Scratch Disks.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • (Photoshop) Choose the desired disks from the menus. You can assign up to four scratch disks of any size your file system supports. Photoshop lets you create up to 200 GB of scratch disk space using those scratch disks.
    • (ImageReady) Choose a primary scratch disk.
  3. Click OK.
  4. Restart Photoshop or ImageReady for the change to take effect.
 

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