What is Software? | What is Education? | What is Technology? | What is Research? | What is Wi-Fi? | What is Communication? | What is Customer Service?

Free SEO Tutorials & Help

Tutorials:   Adobe Flash   Adobe Photoshop   CorelDRAW   SEO  

Site Map

Website Development | Cable & Broadband Magazine | Solutions for Higher Education | Auction Anything Online

Adobe Photoshop Help & Tutorials

 Back to Topics

 

How to Get an Image into Photoshop and ImageReady

Working with bitmap images and vector graphics

Top

Computer graphics fall into two main categories--bitmap and vector. You can work with both types of graphics in Photoshop and ImageReady; moreover, a Photoshop file can contain both bitmap and vector data. Understanding the difference between the two categories helps as you create, edit, and import artwork.

 

Understanding image size and resolution

Top

Understanding the relationship between the pixel dimension of an image and its print resolution is key to producing high-quality images.

The amount of detail in an image depends on its pixel dimensions, while the image resolution controls how much space the pixels are printed over. For example, you can modify an image's resolution without changing the actual pixel data in the image--all you change is the printed size of the image. However, if you want to maintain the same output dimensions, changing the image's resolution requires a change in the total number of pixels.


Pixel dimensions equal document (output) size times resolution A. Decreasing the resolution without changing pixel dimensions (no resampling) B. Original dimensions and resolution C. Decreasing the resolution at same document size decreases pixel dimensions (resampling)
 

Changing image size and resolution

Top

Once you have scanned or imported an image, you may want to adjust its size. In Photoshop, the Image Size dialog box lets you adjust the pixel dimensions, print dimensions, and resolution of an image; in ImageReady, you can adjust only the pixel dimensions of an image.

For assistance with resizing and resampling images in Photoshop, choose Help > Resize Image. This interactive wizard helps you scale your images for print or online media.

Keep in mind that bitmap and vector data can produce different results when you resize an image. Bitmap data is resolution-dependent; therefore, changing the pixel dimensions of a bitmap image can cause a loss in image quality and sharpness. In contrast, vector data is resolution-independent; you can resize it without losing its crisp edges.


Getting images from digital cameras

Top

    You can import images from your digital camera using TWAIN drivers, or using Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) if you're using a PC. Once images are opened in Photoshop or ImageReady, you can edit them.

    You can also get images using a memory or flash card reader.

 

Working with camera raw image files
The Photoshop Camera Raw plug-in lets you open a camera's raw digital image files so that you can edit them in Photoshop or ImageReady. As you open the camera raw image files, you can quickly apply adjustments such as exposure compensation or tonal adjustments without compressing the image or losing any of the original image data. The camera raw image file can then be brought into Photoshop and saved in a final format such as PSD, JPEG, Large Document Format (PSB), or TIFF. By default, Camera Raw settings are stored on a per-image basis in a Camera Raw database file. You can choose a preference to have the settings saved in sidecar XMP files (files that accompany the original camera raw image file in the same folder) instead of a Camera Raw database. For more information about Camera Raw settings,

 

Scanning images

Top

Before you scan an image, make sure that the software necessary for your scanner has been installed. To ensure a high-quality scan, predetermine the scanning resolution and dynamic range your image requires. These preparatory steps can also prevent unwanted color casts from being introduced by your scanner.

Scanner drivers are provided and supported by the manufacturers of the scanners, not Adobe Systems Incorporated. If you have problems with scanning, make sure that you are using the latest version of the appropriate scanner driver.

When scanning images, try to scan similar images together. For example, it's better to scan dark images with other dark images instead of images that are too light. You'll have better scanned output, and correcting your images will be easier.

 

Creating new images

Top

    The New command lets you create a blank image. If you've copied a selection to the Clipboard, the image dimensions and resolution are automatically based on that image data.

To create a new image:

  1. Choose File > New.
  2. If desired, type a name for the image, and set the width and height.

    (Photoshop) To match the width and height of the new image to that of any open image, choose a filename from the bottom section of the Windows menu.

  3. (Photoshop) Set the resolution and mode. For more information,
  4. Select an option for the contents of the background layer (Photoshop) or first layer (ImageReady) of the image:
    • White to fill the background or first layer with white, the default background color.
    • Background Color to fill the background or first layer with the current background color.
    • Transparent to make the first layer transparent, with no color values. The resulting document will have a single, transparent layer as its contents.
  5. Under Advanced, choose a color profile, or choose Don't Color Manage this Document. For Pixel Aspect Ratio, choose Square unless you're using the image for video. In that case, choose another option to use non-square pixels.
  6. When you're finished, you can save the settings as a preset by clicking the Save Preset button, or you can click the OK button to open the new file.
 
Using the File Browser (Photoshop)

Top

File Browser lets you view, sort, and process image files. You can use the File Browser to perform tasks such as creating new folders; renaming, moving, and deleting files; and rotating images. You can also view individual file information and data imported from your digital camera.

The Photoshop File Browser A. Palette pop-up menu B. Palettes C. Toolbar D. Caption E. Location bar F. Main window G. Flag icon H. Selected file I. Rank

 

Opening and importing images

Top

You can open and import images in various file formats. The available formats appear in the File Browser, the Open dialog box, the Open As dialog box (Windows), or the Import submenu.

Note: Photoshop and ImageReady use plug-in modules to open and import many file formats. If a file format does not appear in the Open dialog box or in the File > Import submenu, you may need to install the format's plug-in module.

 

Placing files

Top

    You can use the File > Place command to place artwork into a new layer in an image. In Photoshop, you can place PDF, Adobe Illustrator, and EPS files; in ImageReady, you can place files in any supported format, with the exception of Photoshop (PSD) files containing CMYK images.

    When you place a PDF, Adobe Illustrator, or EPS file, it is rasterized; you cannot edit text or vector data in placed artwork. Keep in mind that artwork is rasterized at the resolution of the file into which it is placed.

To place a PDF, Adobe Illustrator, or EPS file (Photoshop):

  1. Open the Photoshop image into which you want to place the artwork.
  2. Choose File > Place, select the file you want to place, and click Place.
  3. If you are placing a PDF file that contains multiple pages, select the page you want to place in the provided dialog box, and click OK.

    The placed artwork appears inside a bounding box at the center of the Photoshop image. The artwork maintains its original aspect ratio; however, if the artwork is larger than the Photoshop image, it is resized to fit.

  4. If desired, reposition the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
    • Position the pointer inside the bounding box of the placed artwork, and drag.
    • In the options bar, enter a value for X to specify the distance between the center point of the placed artwork and the left edge of the image. Enter a value for Y to specify the distance between the center point of the placed artwork and the top edge of the image.
    • To adjust the center point of the placed artwork, drag the center point to a new location, or click a handle on the center point icon in the options bar.
  5. If desired, scale the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
    • Drag one of the handles at the corners or sides of the bounding box. Hold down Shift as you drag a corner handle to constrain the proportions.
    • In the options bar, enter values for W and H to specify the width and height of the artwork. By default, these options represent scale as a percentage; however, you can enter another unit of measurement. To constrain the proportions of the artwork, click the Constrain Proportions icon ; the option is on when the icon has a white background.
  6. If desired, rotate the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
    • Position the pointer outside the bounding box of the placed artwork (the pointer turns into a curved arrow), and drag.
    • In the options bar, enter a value (in degrees) for the Rotation option .

    The artwork rotates around the center point of the placed artwork. To adjust the center point, drag it to a new location, or click a handle on the Center Point icon in the options bar.

  7. If desired, skew the placed artwork by holding down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS), and dragging a side handle of the bounding box.
  8. Set the Anti-alias option in the options bar as desired. To blend edge pixels during rasterization, select the Anti-alias option. To produce a hard-edged transition between edge pixels during rasterization, deselect the Anti-alias option.
  9. To commit the placed artwork to a new layer, do one of the following:
    • Click the Commit button in the options bar.
    • Press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

    To cancel the placement, click the Cancel button  in the options bar, or press Esc.

To place a file (ImageReady):

  1. Open the ImageReady image into which you want to place the file.
  2. Choose File > Place, select the file you want to place, and click Open.
  3. Select offset options:
    • From the Horizontal pop-up menu, choose an option for placing the file horizontally with respect to the image. In the Pixels text box, enter the number of pixels to offset the placed image horizontally.
    • From the Vertical pop-up menu, choose an option for placing the file vertically with respect to the image. In the Pixels text box, enter the number of pixels to offset the placed image vertically.

    Note: To enter a negative number (and offset the placed file to the left or below the image), type a hyphen (-) before the number.

  4. Click OK.
  5. If you are placing a PDF file that contains multiple pages, select the page you want to place, and click OK.
  6. If you are placing a PDF or EPS file, select Rasterize options, and click OK:
    • Enter Width and Height values for Image Size.
    • Select Anti-aliased to minimize the jagged appearance of the artwork's edges as it is rasterized.
    • Select Constrain Proportions to maintain the same height-to-width ratio.

 

Copyright ADOBE - All Rights Reserved Worldwide

 

 

More Topics:

Explore Work Area  in Photoshop

Key Board Shortcuts in Photoshop:

How to get an Image into Photoshop and ImageReady

Keys for selecting tools in Photoshop

How to Producing Consistent Color in Photoshop

Keys for selecting tools in the Extract toolbox in Photoshop

Working with Color in Photoshop

Keys for selecting tools in the Liquify toolbox in Photoshop

How to do Color and Tonal Adjustments in Photoshop

Keys for working with Extract*, Liquify, and Pattern Maker* in Photoshop

How to work with Selections in Photoshop

Keys for using the File Browser in Photoshop

How to work with Transforming and Retouching in Photoshop

Keys for using the Filter Gallery in Photoshop

Keys for using the Actions palette in Photoshop

Learn Drawing in Photoshop

Keys for using the Camera Raw dialog box in Photoshop

Keys for using the Animation palette in ImageReady

Learn Painting in Photoshop

Keys for using Photomerge in Photoshop

Keys for using the Brushes palette in Photoshop

How to use Channels in Photoshop

Keys for working with blending modes in Photoshop

Keys for using the Channels palette  in Photoshop

How to Work with Layers in Photoshop

Keys for viewing images in Photoshop

Keys for using the Color palette in Photoshop

How to apply Filters & Special Effects in Photoshop

Keys for selecting and moving objects in Photoshop

Keys for using the Color Table palette in ImageReady

How to use Character & Type in Photoshop

Keys for editing paths in Photoshop

Keys for using the History palette in Photoshop

How to Design Webpage in Photoshop

Keys for painting objects in Photoshop

Keys for using the Info palette in Photoshop

How to Create Complex Web Graphics in ImageReady

Keys for transforming selections, selection borders, and paths in Photoshop

Keys for using the Layer Comps palette in Photoshop

How to Develop Graphics for Web in Photoshop

Keys for selecting, editing, and navigating through text in Photoshop

Keys for using the Layers palette in Photoshop

How to Save & Export Images

Keys for formatting type in Photoshop

Keys for using the Paths palette in Photoshop

How to Print in Photoshop

Keys for slicing and optimizing in Photoshop

Keys for using the Swatches palette in Photoshop

How to Create Automated Tasks in Photoshop

Keys for using palettes in Photoshop

(F) Function keys in Photoshop