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How to Producing Consistent Color in Photoshop

An introduction to color management

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Colors in an image will sometime look different when viewed on different monitors. They may also look very different when printed on your desktop printer or printed in a publication. If you need to produce consistent color across different devices, managing color should be an essential part of your workflow

 

Understanding color

Color is how you perceive light. The light may be reflected, transmitted, diffracted, or emitted

 

Why colors sometimes don't match

The colors in an image change as you bring the image in from a scanner or digital camera and view it on your computer monitor. The colors change again when you send the image out to be printed on your desktop printer or printing press. This is because every device--a digital camera, scanner, computer monitor, desktop printer, printing press--operates within a different color space. Incorrect color transformation or lack of color transformation from one color space to another causes color inconsistency. Correctly transforming the color values creates color consistency. For more information on correctly transforming the color values,


Using color management to produce consistent color

Photoshop's color management system helps you maintain the appearance of colors as you bring an image in from a source device, edit the image on your computer, and then output your image. Photoshop follows a color management workflow based on conventions developed by the International Color Consortium (ICC), a group responsible for standardized profile formats and procedures so consistent color can result from software and devices working together.

 

Calibrating and creating profiles

The color management system uses profiles to know how a device produces color and what the actual colors in a document are. Device profiles are often installed when a device is added to your system. The accuracy of these profiles (often called generic profiles or canned profiles) varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. Third-party software and hardware can also create device profiles (often called custom profiles).



Color management system using profiles to correctly transform color from one color space to another A. Profile describing the meaning of the RGB values in the document B. Color management system using a color reference (Lab) to identify the actual colors C. Output profile (destination profile) describing the device's color space so the RGB values are translated to maintain consistent colors when printed in CMYK

Using the Photoshop Color Settings

A color management system does not guarantee predictable color unless it's properly set up. Your monitor can be calibrated, you can have profiles for all your devices, and still end up with colors that shift unpredictably. Photoshop simplifies the task of setting up a color-managed workflow by gathering most color management controls in one convenient location, the Color Settings dialog box.

 

About working spaces

A working space is the default profile for an image while you're editing it in Photoshop. It defines the color space in which you are editing an image.

Lab

Cannot be selected as a working space in the Color Settings dialog box. If you choose to edit a document in Lab mode, the document is converted to your monitor's color space prior to viewing and you will have limited editing capabilities. Because Lab encompasses the complete range of visible colors, for practical reasons it is better to work in color spaces (such as RGB and CMYK) that are smaller and more in line with the color spaces of devices that capture, display, or output images.

RGB working spaces

Are based on the RGB color model. Some RGB working space options are device-dependent (such as a monitor-profile-based working space) and some are device-independent (such as Adobe RGB, Apple RGB, and sRGB). It's probably best to use a device-independent working space for most image editing.

CMYK working spaces

Are device-dependent. While an RGB working space can be device-independent, CMYK working spaces are based on actual combinations of ink and paper. It's often best to use an RGB working space for editing your image in Photoshop and then use the appropriate CMYK profile to convert your RGB image to CMYK in preparation for printing. The data in the CMYK working space is the data that will be used to convert the image to CMYK. For more information on RGB and CMYK working spaces,

Photoshop gives you the option of embedding the profile of your working space when you save an image. Embedding a profile is recommended because it tells Photoshop and other color-management-savvy applications the color meaning of the numeric values in the document.


Adobe RGB and sRGB are smaller color spaces than Lab and provide a practical working space to edit and output images. A. Adobe RGB (1998) B. sRGB

 
Choosing an RGB working space

Choosing an RGB working space is a balancing act. On one hand, you want a working space whose gamut is large enough to encompass the color spaces of all the devices in your workflow. But, on the other hand, it's possible to choose a working space that's too large. When you work in RGB, you have 255 levels of intensity for each color. The larger the RGB working space, the father apart each color value would be from its nearest neighbor. As a result, the jump from one level of color intensity to the next could be visually significant.

To choose an RGB working space:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
  2. Under Working Spaces, choose an option from the RGB menu:

    Adobe RGB (1998)

    Is the largest recommended RGB working space and suited for print production with a broad range of colors.

    Apple RGB

    Reflects the characteristics of the older 13-inch Mac OS monitor. This space is suitable for working with older desktop publishing files or for emulating Photoshop 4.0 and earlier.

    ColorMatch RGB

    Matches the native color space of the old Radius Pressview monitors. This space is a smaller gamut alternative to Adobe RGB (1998) for print production work.

    sRGB

    Is designed to reflect the characteristics of the average PC monitor. sRGB is suitable for RGB images destined for the Web, but not recommended for print production work.

    Monitor RGB

    Sets the RGB working space to your current monitor color space. This setting is suitable when you're trying to match the RGB color in non-color-managed applications like Adobe GoLive.

    ColorSync RGB

    (Mac OS) Matches the RGB color space specified in the Apple ColorSync control panel.

    Note: When the Advanced Mode option is selected in the Color Settings dialog box, every RGB profile on your computer is displayed in the RGB working space menu. You can even choose Custom RGB to define your own RGB working space. This is recommended only for users who have a good understanding of color.
     

Choosing a CMYK working space


CMYK working spaces are generally based on actual ink and paper combinations. When the Advanced Mode option is not selected in the Color Settings dialog box, you can choose from seven ICC press profiles and Custom CMYK. Mac OS users can also choose the ColorSync profile that is specified in the Color Sync preferences. This setting matches the CMYK space specified in the Apple ColorSync control panel.
 

About color management policies

Color management policies determine how to handle color data that does not match your current color working space. Policies provide guidelines on what to do when you open a document or import color data into an active document. For information about working spaces,
 
Customizing advanced color management settings

When the Advanced mode is selected, the Photoshop Color Setting dialog box lets you specify conversion options to handle the colors in a document as it moves from one color space to another. It also has advanced controls for desaturating monitor colors to visualize color spaces with gamuts greater than that of the monitor and for controlling the blending behavior of RGB colors. These options are not available if the Advanced Mode is turned off.

 
Saving and loading custom working space profiles

If none of the working space options in the Color Settings dialog box accurately describe the color space of your particular output or display device, you can create a custom RGB, CMYK, Grayscale, or Spot working space profile. Saving your custom profile ensures that you can reuse it and share it with other users and other Adobe applications that use the Color Settings dialog box.

You can also load a profile that has not been saved in the recommended profile location, so that the profile appears in the Color Settings dialog box.

To save a custom working space profiles:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
  2. Create a custom working space profile by doing one of the following in the Color Settings dialog box:
    • Choose Custom RGB from the RGB menu. In the Custom RGB dialog box, give the custom profile a name, and then specify the gamma, white point, and primaries options. Click OK.
    • Choose Custom CMYK from the CMYK menu. In the Custom CMYK dialog box, give the custom profile a name, and then specify the ink options and separation options. Click OK.
    • Choose Custom Dot Gain from either the Gray menu or the Spot menu. In the Custom Dot Gain dialog box, give the custom profile a name, and then specify the dot gain curve.
    • Choose Custom Gamma from the Gray menu. In the Custom Gamma dialog box, give the custom profile a name and then enter a value for the gamma.
  3. Depending on the custom profile you created, in the Working Spaces area of the Color Settings dialog box, choose one of the following:
    • Save RGB from the RGB menu.
    • Save CMYK from the CMYK menu.
    • Save Gray from the Gray menu.
    • Save Spot from the Spot menu.
  4. Name and save the profile. Profiles can be saved to the system profile location (depending on the operating system) or to (Windows) Program Files/CommonFiles/Adobe/Color/Profiles or (Mac OS) Library/Application Support/Adobe/Color/Profiles. On Mac OS, the profiles can also be saved to the user-specific Application Support folder as well.

    To access a saved profile, you may need to load it or restart Photoshop. If you do not save a custom profile, it will be stored only in the custom color settings file of which it is a part and will not be available as a profile option in the Color Settings dialog box.

To load a custom profile:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
  2. In the Working Spaces area of the Color Settings dialog box, choose:
    • Load RGB from the RGB menu.
    • Load CMYK from the CMYK menu.
    • Load Gray from the Gray menu.
    • Load Spot from the Spot menu.
  3. Locate and select the desired profile, and click Open.

    If you load a profile that has been saved outside the recommended location, it temporarily replaces the Other option in the Working Spaces menu until another profile is loaded.

 

Creating custom grayscale and spot-color profiles

    You can create a custom grayscale or spot-color profile based on the specific dot-gain or gamma characteristics of your output device. You can also load a CMYK profile into the Gray working space menu to generate a custom grayscale profile based on the CMYK space.

To create a grayscale or spot-color profile based on a custom dot gain:

  1. Print a hard proof with calibration bars included.
  2. Using a reflective densitometer, take a reading at one or more marks of the printed calibration bar.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
  4. Under Working Spaces, for Gray or Spot, choose Custom Dot Gain.
  5. For Name, enter the name for the custom profile.
  6. Do one of the following:
    • Using your densitometer readings, calculate the required adjustments, and enter the percentage values in the text boxes.

    For example, if you have specified a 30% dot, and the densitometer reading is 36%, you have a 6% dot gain in your midtones. To compensate for this gain, enter 36% in the 30% text box.

    • Click to add an adjustment point in the dot gain curve, and drag the point to change its value. The value then appears in the appropriate text box.
    • Click OK.
  7. Save the custom profile.

To create a grayscale profile based on a custom gamma:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • In Windows, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
    • In Mac OS, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
  2. Select Advanced.
  3. Under Working Spaces, for Gray, choose Custom Gamma.
  4. For Name, enter the name for the custom profile.
  5. Specify the desired gamma value, and click OK.
  6. Save the custom profile.

 

Creating a viewing environment for color management

Your work environment influences how you see color on your monitor and on printed output. For best results, control the colors and light in your work environment by doing the following:

    • View your documents in an environment that provides a consistent light level and color temperature. For example, the color characteristics of sunlight change throughout the day and alter the way colors appear on your screen, so keep shades closed or work in a windowless room. To eliminate the blue-green cast from fluorescent lighting, consider installing D50 (5000 degree Kelvin) lighting. Ideally, view printed documents using a D50 lightbox or using the ANSI PH2.30 viewing standard for graphic arts.
    • View your document in a room with neutral-colored walls and ceiling. A room's color can affect the perception of both monitor color and printed color. The best color for a viewing room is polychromatic gray. Also, the color of your clothing reflecting off the glass of your monitor may affect the appearance of colors on-screen.
    • Match the light intensity in the room or variable lightbox to the light intensity of your monitor. View continuous-tone art, printed output, and images on-screen under the same intensity of light.
    • Remove colorful background and user-interface patterns on your monitor desktop. Busy or bright patterns surrounding a document interfere with accurate color perception. Set your desktop to display neutral grays only.
    • View document proofs in the real-world conditions under which your audience will see the final piece. For example, you might want to see how a housewares catalog looks under the incandescent light bulbs used in homes, or view an office furniture catalog under the fluorescent lighting used in offices. However, always make final color judgments under the lighting conditions specified by the legal requirements for contract proofs in your country.
 
Compensating for dot gain in film using transfer functions

When using CMYK color profiles, you cannot customize dot gain settings. However, you may be able to compensate for dot gain from a miscalibrated imagesetter by using transfer functions.

Transfer functions enable you to compensate for dot gain between the image and film. For example, the Transfer function makes 50% dots in the image print as 50% dots on film. Similar to dot gain curves, the transfer functions let you specify up to 13 values along the grayscale to create a customized transfer function. Unlike dot gain curves, transfer functions apply only to printing--they don't affect the image color data.

Use the following guidelines to determine the best method of accounting for dot gain:

    • If you are using a custom CMYK profile, use the dot gain settings in the custom CMYK dialog box to adjust dot gain so that it matches the printed results.
    • If you are using an ICC profile and the dot gain values do not match the printed results, try to obtain a new profile with values that do match.
    • Use transfer functions only if neither of the previous methods is an option.

To adjust transfer function values:

  1. Use a transmissive densitometer to record the density values at the appropriate steps in your image on film.
  2. Choose File > Print with Preview.
  3. Select Show More Options, and choose Output from the pop-up menu.
  4. Click the Transfer button.
  5. Calculate the required adjustment, and enter the values (as percentages) in the Transfer Functions dialog box.

    For example, if you specified a 50% dot, and your imagesetter prints it at 58%, an 8% dot gain occurs in the midtones. To compensate for this gain, enter 42% (50% - 8%) in the 50% text box of the Transfer Functions dialog box. The imagesetter then prints the 50% dot you want.

    When entering transfer function values, keep in mind the density range of your imagesetter. On a given imagesetter, a very small highlight dot may be too small to hold ink. Beyond a certain density level, the shadow dots may fill as solid black, removing all detail in shadow areas.

    Note: To preserve transfer functions in an exported EPS file, select Override Printer's Default Functions in the Transfer Functions dialog box and then export the file with Include Transfer Functions selected in the EPS Format dialog box.

To save the current transfer function settings as the default:

    Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) to change the Save button to --> Default, and click the button.

To load the default transfer function settings:

    Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) to change the Load button to <-- Default, and click the button.

 

Soft-proofing colors

In a traditional publishing workflow, a hard proof of your document (sometimes called a proof print or match print) is produced so you can preview how the document's colors will look when reproduced on a specific output device. In a color-managed workflow, color profiles tell the color management system how to display a preview (soft proof) of your document directly on the monitor. This provides an on-screen preview of the document's colors as reproduced on a specified device. You can print the soft proof using your desktop printer to produce a hard proof.

Keep in mind that the reliability of the soft proof depends upon the quality of your monitor, the profiles of your monitor and output devices, and the ambient lighting conditions of your work environment.

 
Printing a hard proof

A hard proof (sometimes called a proof print or match print) is a printed simulation of what your final output on a printing press will look like. A hard proof is produced on an output device that's less expensive than a printing press. In recent years some inkjet printers have the resolution necessary to produce inexpensive prints that can be used as hard proofs.

To print a hard proof:

  1. Open the document in Photoshop.
  2. Choose View > Proof Setup > Custom and choose the profile of your output device in the Profile menu. Choose a Rendering Intent from the Intent menu. Click Save to save the settings if you're going to be doing more proofs on the specific output device.
  3. Click OK to close the Proof Setup dialog box.
  4. Choose File > Print with Preview.
  5. In the Print with Preview dialog box, make sure Show More Options is selected and Color Management is chosen.
  6. In the Source Space area, select Proof. The Proof Setup should be the profile you specified.
  7. In the Print Space area, do one of the following:
    • Choose Printer Color Management from the Profile menu if you're printing with the printer driver's choices of factory profiles. This is useful when you don't have custom profiles for the printer, and you want the printer driver to pick the best profile according to the paper type, resolution, and so forth. After clicking the Print button, the Print dialog box (for setting printer options) opens. On Windows, click the Properties button to access the printer driver options and set the color management options. On Mac OS, use the pop-up menu to access the printer driver options and set the color management options.
    • If you're printing with a custom profile, choose the custom profile from the Profile menu. Then click the Print button. The Print dialog box (for setting printer options) opens. On Windows, click the Properties button and set the printer driver options so color management is turned off (the options could be similar to No Color Management, Color Adjustments Off, or Color Management Off). On Mac OS, use the pop-up menu to access the printer driver options for color management and turn color management off.

 

Keeping color consistent between Photoshop and other Adobe applications

It's necessary to specify the same color management settings for the workspaces and conversion options to keep color consistent when moving documents between Photoshop and other Adobe applications that support color management. The Color Settings dialog box represents the common color management controls shared by Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. In Adobe Acrobat, the color management controls are found in the Preferences. Synchronizing the color settings helps to ensure that color is reproduced consistently between Adobe applications that support color management. To share custom color settings between applications, be sure to save your settings (in a .csf file). You can load the settings file in the desired application instead of copying all the settings manually.

Note: If you modify and save over the current Color Settings.csf file in any application other than Photoshop, you may be prompted to synchronize the common color settings upon starting Photoshop or upon reopening the Color Settings dialog box in Photoshop. You can go through the following procedure to re-synchronize the color settings between Photoshop and other Adobe applications.

    Saved settings in Photoshop will appear in the Color Settings menu in Illustrator, InDesign and Acrobat 6.

To synchronize the color settings between Photoshop and other Adobe applications:

  1. Do one of the following:
    • (Windows) Choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • (Mac OS) Choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
  2. In the Color Settings dialog box, choose a preset setting from the Settings menu or specify the settings for the Workspaces, Color Management Policies, and Conversion Options. If necessary, specify the Advanced Controls. For more information,
  3. (Optional) If you customized the color settings, click the Save button, give your settings a name, and click the Save button in the Save dialog box. Saving your settings in a .csf file lets you conveniently share the settings between color-managed Adobe applications.
  4. Click OK in the Color Settings dialog box.
  5. To specify the same color settings in the other Adobe applications, do one of the following:
    • In Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign, choose Edit > Color Settings.
    • In Adobe Acrobat, choose Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Acrobat > Preferences (Mac OS).
  6. (Acrobat and InDesign only) Do one of the following:
    • In Acrobat, click Color Management in the left pane of the Preferences dialog box.
    • In InDesign, select the Enable Color Management option in the Color Settings dialog box.
  7. Use the Settings menu to choose the color settings from Photoshop.
  8. Click OK.

 

Producing consistent color with a desktop printer

Using a color-managed workflow, you can control the appearance of colors in your document so they remain the same or similar when the document is printed on a desktop printer.

    Desktop printer workflow A. Photoshop handling the color management; usually a custom profile is chosen from the Profile menu B. Printer driver handling the color management

To color manage your document for output on a desktop printer:

    Set up your devices for color management

    Calibrate your monitor and create a profile for it. Use Adobe Gamma (Windows), Monitor Calibrator (Mac OS) or, for more precise calibration, use third-party software and hardware. If profiles came with your printer, make sure they're installed on your computer. For important color work, it's highly recommended that you create custom profiles for each type of paper that you use with the printer.

    Set up the Photoshop color management system

    Choose Edit > Color Settings (Windows) or Photoshop > Color Settings (Mac OS) to specify the color management settings. You can either choose a preset from the Settings menu in the Color Settings dialog box or customize the settings. At the very least, you should choose one of the Prepress Default settings, which specifies Adobe RGB (1998) as the RGB working space. Adobe RGB (1998) is a large enough color space to encompass the colors used in printing. In general, it's not advised to use sRGB as the working space, since it's smaller and may not contain important colors that can be printed.

    Edit your image in Photoshop

    Depending on the color management policy you choose, you will be editing the image in either the current RGB working space or in the working space profile embedded in the document. The choice of whether to convert a document to the RGB working space or preserve its embedded profile is a personal decision. For instance, if you feel that Adobe RGB is a suitable working space for all images that you print, you might consider choosing Adobe RGB as your RGB working space, and then choose the Convert to Working Space policy and always working in Adobe RGB.

    (Optional) Soft proof your image

    If you want to see a simulation of your final printed image, use the Proof Setup command and choose the printer's profile. Your monitor will display the image in the color space of your desktop printer. For the most accurate soft proof, choose a profile for the specific paper you're printing on.

    Use Print with Preview

    Choose File > Print with Preview. In the Print dialog box:

    • Select Show More Options and choose Color Management from the pop-up menu.
    • In the Source Space area, Choose Document (unless you're printing a hard copy of the soft proof).
    • In the Print Space area, choose the profile of your printer or your custom profile of a specific printer/paper combination. Photoshop will handle the color management during printing. Choose Printer Color Management if your printer driver is handling the color management during printing.
    • Also in the Print Space area, choose a rendering intent. Generally, Relative Colorimetric or Perceptual are the most common intents used for photographic images because they preserve the overall appearance of a document's colors when printed.

    Set printer options

    Click the Print button in the Print dialog box (for the Print with Preview command) to open a second Print dialog box (for setting printer options). The options available in the printer options dialog box depend on the printer drivers installed on your computer. On Windows, click the Properties button to access the printer driver options. On Mac OS, use the pop-up menu to access the printer driver options. Set the print options for the quality you want. If Photoshop is handling the color adjustment or color management options during printing, turn off all printer driver color adjustment options. If not, specify the color management settings to let your printer driver handle the color management during printing. It's important not to color manage in both Photoshop and the printer driver simultaneously during printing. This results in unpredictable color.

Producing consistent color when sending images to press
Using a color-managed workflow, you can control the appearance of colors in your document so they remain the same or similar when the document is sent out to be printed on a printing press.

To color manage your document for output on a printing press:

    Set up your devices for color management

    Calibrate your monitor and create a profile for it. Use Adobe Gamma (Windows), Monitor Calibrator (Mac OS) or, for more precise calibration, use third-party software and hardware. If profiles came with your printer, make sure they're installed on your computer. For important color work, it's highly recommended that you create custom profiles for each type of paper that you use with the printer.

    Set up the Photoshop color management system

    Choose Edit > Color Settings (Windows) or Photoshop > Color Settings (Mac OS) to specify the color management settings. You can either choose a preset from the Settings menu in the Color Settings dialog box or customize the settings. At the very least, you should choose one of the Prepress Default settings, which specifies Adobe RGB (1998) as the RGB working space. Adobe RGB (1998) is a large enough color space to encompass the colors used in printing. In general, it's not advised to use sRGB as the working space since it's smaller and may not contain important colors that can be printed.

    Synchronize the color settings between Photoshop and Illustrator or InDesign

    If you plan to place your Photoshop image in an Illustrator or InDesign document, make sure the color settings are synchronized using the Color Settings dialog box in each application. For more information on keeping colors consistent between Photoshop and other Adobe applications,

    Edit your image in Photoshop

    Depending on the color management policy you choose, you will be editing the image in either the current RGB working space or in the working space profile embedded in the document. The choice of whether to convert a document to the RGB working space or preserve its embedded profile is a personal decision. For instance, if you feel that Adobe RGB is a suitable working space for all images that you print, you might consider choosing Adobe RGB as your RGB working space, and then choose the Convert to Working Space policy and always working in Adobe RGB.

    (Optional) Place your RGB or CMYK image in Adobe InDesign or Adobe Illustrator

    In general, most images printed on a commercial press are not printed directly from Photoshop but from a page-layout program like Adobe InDesign or a print-savvy program like Adobe Illustrator. For more information on importing Photoshop files into Adobe InDesign or Adobe Illustrator, see Adobe InDesign Help or Adobe Illustrator Help.

    (Optional) Work entirely in RGB mode

    Make sure the image file is tagged with the RGB working space profile. If your printer or prepress vendor uses a color management system, he or she should be able to use your file's profile to make an accurate conversion to CMYK for producing the film and printing plates.

    (Optional) Convert to CMYK

    Work in RGB mode until you finish with your image editing. After editing, convert the image to CMYK mode and make any additional color and tonal adjustments. Be sure to check the highlight and shadow areas of the image. If necessary, use the Levels, Curves, or Hue/Saturation command to make tonal corrections. These image adjustments should be very minor. After making final adjustments, send the CMYK file to your print house or prepress.

 
Producing consistent color when creating images for the Web

Keeping colors consistent in images for the Web is a challenge. You have control over how your images display on your monitor, but you have no control over how they will display on other monitors. Additionally, most browsers do not recognize a document's embedded profile. They simply send the raw RGB values to your monitor. Without a profile, a computer's color management system must guess what colors a document's RGB values actually represent. Although it may seem impossible to produce consistent colors in an image for the Web, there are a few things you can do to keep the colors as consistent as possible.

To keep colors as consistent as possible in Web images:

    Set up your monitor for a color-managed workflow

    Calibrate and profile your monitor. Use a visual calibrator like Adobe Gamma (Windows), Monitor Calibrator (Mac OS) or, for more precision, use third-party software and hardware.

    Set up color management in Photoshop

    Choose Edit > Color Settings (Windows) or Photoshop > Color Settings (Mac OS) and specify the color management settings. You can either choose Web Graphics Defaults from the Settings menu in the Color Settings dialog box or customize the settings. If you prefer not to use the preset option, it's recommended that you at least use sRGB for your working space. sRGB is a smaller color space than Adobe RGB (1998) and supposedly represents the profile of the average monitor. Tagging your image with an sRGB profile increases the possibility that more monitors will correctly display the colors in your image.

    (Optional) Convert the document to sRGB profile

    If you have an image that's tagged with a profile other than sRGB, you can convert profile to sRGB so that the colors have a chance of maintaining a consistent appearance on a wide variety of monitors. Choose Image > Mode > Convert to Profile and choose sRGB for Profile under Destination Space.

    Save for Web

    Choose File > Save for Web. The Save for Web command gives you more control over the optimization of your image. You can specify the colors that are preserved when saving an image in GIF or PNG-8 format. In JPEG format, you have the option of embedding an ICC profile in the file. Currently, only Internet Explorer (Mac OS) and OmniWeb (Mac OS) can read embedded profiles in images if the user enables the ColorSync option in the preferences. If an image has no embedded profile, Internet Explorer (Mac OS) and OmniWeb (Mac OS) assume an sRGB profile for the image.

 

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